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In: Image and Incarnation
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In 1534, on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of religious life, Jan Donteclocke, a Franciscan tertiary from Bruges, threw a banquet for relatives, friends, and fellow brethren. What we know about it comes from a dinner play performed at the event, the Play of a jubilee, written by the Bruges rhetorician Cornelis Everaert. The play’s characters personify aspects of friendship: Benevolence, Affection, and Friendship itself. They presented the jubilarian with four Latin chronograms (on sheets or scrolls of paper or wooden panels) which contained the dates of Donteclocke’s birth, profession, ordination, and jubilee. Chronograms, because of their playful, riddle-like character, were ideal vehicles of humanist wit and ingenuity. The article discusses these chronograms as expressions of friendship and analyses how they may have sparked conversation among the dinner guests, thus attesting to a culture of spirited conviviality existing beyond the circles of learned humanists or well-to-do bourgeois.

Open Access
In: Netherlands Yearbook for History of Art / Nederlands Kunsthistorisch Jaarboek Online
In: The Authority of the Word
In: Education and Learning in the Netherlands, 1400-1600
In: The Turn of the Soul
In: The Turn of the Soul
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Bart Ramakers: Sophonisba’s Dress. Costume, tragedy and value on the Antwerp Stage (c. 1615-1630)

In: Netherlands Yearbook for History of Art / Nederlands Kunsthistorisch Jaarboek Online
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This essay concerns itself with the category of the costumed entry at the Leiden rhetoricians’ festival of 1596. The entry by the Haarlem chamber of rhetoric The Pelican was designed by Hendrick Goltzius. It is argued that inventions like Goltzius’s were considered examples of good or best practice from which other artists and craftsmen involved in entry-making could learn, both during and after the event. The latter purpose was served by the printed festival book, which contained information on both invention (iconography) and execution (materials and techniques) of the entry characters. The use of such festival books is further corroborated by an analysis of the book collection of the Pelican chamber, which has survived more or less complete.

In: Netherlands Yearbook for History of Art / Nederlands Kunsthistorisch Jaarboek Online