Behnam Sadeghi

Abstract

The Kitāb al-āthar represents the lecture notes of two students of a single teacher who is alleged by the two students to be al-Shaybāni. These two attempted to write down in a verbatim fashion the traditions quoted by the teacher; however, when the teacher compared his views with those of other jurists, the students (or, at least, one of them) felt free to write down the comparisons in their own, personal styles. This discrepancy, I argue, confirms that the teacher was not a scholar who projected his own views back onto al-Shaybāni. The teacher was indeed al-Shaybāni himself. Stylistic analysis indicates that the book did not grow organically. It also shows that the Muwatta' of al-Shaybāni shared its origin with the Athār ; thus, the former, too, is authentic. The essay concludes with a comment on the authenticity of the materials attributed by al-Shaybāni to certain earlier authorities.

Behnam Sadeghi

Abstract

I verify a chronology in which seven groups of passages represent consecutive phases. A proposed chronology is verified if independent markers of style vary over its phases in a smooth fashion. Four markers of style follow smooth trajectories over the seven phases: The first is average verse length. The second encompasses the 28 most common morphemes in the Qurān. The percentages of these morphemes in a text constitute its stylistic profile. The thus-defined stylistic profile is shown to vary in a smooth fashion over “time”, i.e. over the proposed chronological sequence of phases. Third, a similar thing holds for a profile based on the frequencies of 114 other common morphemes. Fourth, similar results are obtained for a list of 3693 relatively uncommon morphemes. In addition to establishing a relative chronology in seven phases, this essay demonstrates the stylistic unity of many large passages. It also shows that the Qurān has one author.

Behnam Sadeghi and Uwe Bergmann

Abstract

The essay discusses a manuscript of the Qurān dating from the first half of the seventh century AD. The text does not belong to the Utmānic textual tradition, making this the only known manuscript of a non-Utmānic text type. The essay compares this text type with those of the Utmānic and other Companion textual traditions in order to shed light on the Prophetic prototype.

The Islamic Scholarly Tradition

Studies in History, Law, and Thought in Honor of Professor Michael Allan Cook

Series:

Edited by Asad Q. Ahmed, Michael Bonner and Behnam Sadeghi

The volume contains highly original articles on Islamic history, law, and thought, each either proposing new hypotheses or readjusting existing ones. The contributions range from studies in the formulation of the pre-Islamic Arabian calendar to notes on the "blood-money group" in Islamic law, and to transformations in Arabic logic in the post-Avicennan period. Prepared by former students of Michael A. Cook, to whom this volume is dedicated, these studies not only shed new light on the development of the Islamic scholarly tradition from various perspectives, but together they also represent the honoree's vast, profound, and continuing impact on the field.
This collection of highly empirical articles is intended for scholars and students specializing in various subfields within Islamic Studies.

Islamic Cultures, Islamic Contexts

Essays in Honor of Professor Patricia Crone

Series:

Edited by Asad Q. Ahmed, Behnam Sadeghi, Robert G. Hoyland and Adam Silverstein

This volume brings together articles on various aspects of the intellectual and social
histories of Islamicate societies and of the traditions and contexts that contributed to their
formation and evolution. Written by leading scholars who span three generations and
who cover such diverse fields as Late Antique Studies, Islamic Studies, Classics, and Jewish
Studies, the volume is a testament to the breadth and to the sustained, deep impact of the
corpus of the honoree, Professor Patricia Crone.

Contributors are: David Abulafia, Asad Q. Ahmed, Karen Bauer, Michael Cooperson, Hannah Cotton, David M. Eisenberg, Khaled El-Rouayheb, Matthew S. Gordon, Gerald Hawting, Judith Herrin, Robert Hoyland, Bella Tendler Krieger, Margaret Larkin, Maria Mavroudi, Christopher Melchert, Pavel Pavlovitch, David Powers, Chase Robinson, Behnam Sadeghi, Adam Silverstein, Devin Stewart, Guy Stroumsa, D. G. Tor, Kevin van Bladel, David J. Wasserstein, Chris Wickam, Joseph Witztum, F. W. Zimmermann

Series:

Edited by Behnam Sadeghi, Asad Q. Ahmed, Adam Silverstein and Robert Hoyland

Series:

Edited by Behnam Sadeghi, Asad Q. Ahmed, Adam Silverstein and Robert Hoyland