Abstract

Cato’s Stoic republicanism in the extant text of the De bello civili lends itself to the view that he is the victim of sustained irony; or that he re-embodies Pompey as sanitized republican symbol but is himself exemplary of a sterile philosophy; or that deconstruction in the context of Lucanian civil war renders Cato at best an advocate of ideological self-fashioning but at worst an exemplar of a virtus as insane as Caesar’s furor. Reassertion of Cato’s status as the outstanding hero of the De bello civili remains deeply problematic.

In: Brill's Companion to Lucan
In: Brill's Companion to Silius Italicus