Series:

Olga Borik and Berit Gehrke

Series:

Olga Borik and Berit Gehrke

Abstract

In this introduction, we provide a general overview of the semantic and syntactic properties of pseudo-incorporation, which is intended to serve as a basis for accessing the papers in this volume. Given that pseudo-incorporation shares semantic properties with other phenomena, in particular morphosyntactic and semantic incorporation and weak referentiality (expressed by bare plurals and weak definites), we will also present the main characteristics of these phenomena. Additionally, we point out issues in the study of pseudo-incorporation that still need to be resolved, such as, for instance, the definitional debate as to what kind of empirical facts fall under the umbrella of pseudo-incorporation. We conclude by providing short summaries of each contribution to this volume.

Series:

Olga Borik and Berit Gehrke

Series:

Elena Castroviejo and Berit Gehrke

Abstract

This chapter is concerned with intensification as triggered by subsective evaluative good in Catalan (in examples such as una bona dosi ‘a good dose’). Its main focus is on providing an account of the fact that intensification only comes about in positive polarity environments. We first entertain an analysis based on the idea that positive polarity is the result of a mismatch of meanings contributed at different dimensions, but end up supporting an alternative in which the dimensions of evaluation of the noun play a crucial role in giving rise to intensification. More specifically, intensification arises when an object is only evaluated according to one dimension. Interestingly, uni-dimensionality is not preserved under negation, which prevents intensification from arising, and, in turn, makes positive polarity an illusion.

Series:

Edited by Olga Borik and Berit Gehrke

This volume brings together recent research on the semantics and syntax of pseudo-incorporation (PI), which is a construction of crucial significance for linguistic explorations as it brings together several fundamental areas of linguistic research, such as morphology, argument structure, modification, discourse and information structure. The main purpose of the book is to further improve our understanding of the phenomenon, expand the domain of inquiry by bringing into focus new empirical data from a wide array of languages, offer new formal analyses of PI, and strengthen the links with other related phenomena, such as bare nominals. Focusing on various properties of PI the articles in this volume set an excellent ground for further expansion of research in PI and related topics.

Contributors are Michael Barrie, Olga Borik, Veneeta Dayal, Carmen Dobrovie-Sorin, Werner Frey, Berit Gehrke, Ion Giurgea, Audrey Li, Fereshteh Modarresi, Olav Mueller-Reichau, Natalia Serdobolskaya, and Henriëtte de Swart.