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Volume Editor:
Arts education research in Canada has increased significantly since the beginning of this century. New forms of arts-based research, such as ethnodrama and a/r/t/ography, have arisen and made significant contributions to the literature. Researchers in departments/schools/faculties of dance, drama, music, visual arts, media studies, cultural studies and education have been successful in acquiring peer-reviewed grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council to undertake large-scale projects and disseminate the findings internationally. The purpose of this edited collection, entitled Perspectives on Arts Education Research in Canada, Volume 2: Issues and Directions, is to provide an overview of the current research undertaken across the country, thereby providing a valuable resource for students, professors and research associates working in the arts disciplines, media studies, education, and cultural studies.

Contributors are: Bernard W. Andrews, Kathy Browning, Ranya Essmat Saad, Maia Giesbrecht, Shelley M. Griffin, Rita Irwin, Glenys McQueen-Fuentes, Laura Nemoy, Lori Lynn Penny, Jennifer Roswell, Michelle Searle, Alison Shields, Anita Sinner, Darlene St. Georges, Peter Vietgen, John L. Vitale, Jennifer Wicks, Kari-Lynn Winters, and Thibault Zimmer.
Volume Editor:
Arts education research has increased significantly since the beginning of the new millennium. This peer-reviewed book, the first of two volumes, captures some of the exciting developments in Canada. There is geographical diversity represented from across this large country, as well as theoretical and methodological diversity in the chapters. There is also a sense of togetherness with those, and other, diversities. There are calls to action and calls to play. We hear voices of artists, researchers, and artist researchers. The life histories of others, and of the self, are presented. Perspectives on Arts Education Research in Canada, Volume 1: Surveying the Landscape provides a wide spectrum of current research by members of the Arts Researchers and Teachers Society (ARTS)/La societé des chercheurs et des enseignants des arts (SCEA), a Special Interest Group (SIG) within the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies (CACS), which is in turn, is a constituent association of the Canadian Society for the Study of Education (CSSE).

Contributors are: Bernard W. Andrews, Julia Brook, Susan Catlin, Genevieve Cloutier, Yoriko Gillard, Kate Greenway, Michael Hayes, Nané Jordan, Sajani (Jinny) Menon, Catrina Migliore, Kathryn Ricketts, Pauline Sameshima, and Sean Wiebe.
Chapter 9 Artists Helping Teachers

Abstract

This inquiry examined teacher perspectives on artist involvement in an integrated arts professional development program for elementary and secondary practitioners. Findings indicate that engagement in cross-curricular activities with professional artists employing a constructivist approach fostered a change in teacher beliefs about arts pedagogy. The participants indicated a preference for an integrated approach to arts instruction rather than the traditional, differentiated model which emphasizes separate arts disciplines. Teachers reported that the artists’ focus on personal creativity developed their innate artistic abilities. This enabled them to understand their students’ arts experiences and value diversity in learning. The offering of the program in Canada’s national cultural venues motivated the teachers to learn, stimulated their creativity, contextualized the learning, and instilled a sense of purpose for arts education. The integrated arts approach promoted the teachers’ cognitive and emotional development, enabled them to explore independent, self-directed learnings, fostered awareness of the interconnectedness of arts forms, and reinforced cross-curricular instruction through the arts. Such findings suggest that professional artists helping teachers to learn to teach the arts on-site through an integrated arts approach is a viable model of teacher development for improving arts instruction.

In: Perspectives on Arts Education Research in Canada, Volume 2

Abstract

This inquiry examined teacher perspectives on artist involvement in an integrated arts professional development program for elementary and secondary practitioners. Findings indicate that engagement in cross-curricular activities with professional artists employing a constructivist approach fostered a change in teacher beliefs about arts pedagogy. The participants indicated a preference for an integrated approach to arts instruction rather than the traditional, differentiated model which emphasizes separate arts disciplines. Teachers reported that the artists’ focus on personal creativity developed their innate artistic abilities. This enabled them to understand their students’ arts experiences and value diversity in learning. The offering of the program in Canada’s national cultural venues motivated the teachers to learn, stimulated their creativity, contextualized the learning, and instilled a sense of purpose for arts education. The integrated arts approach promoted the teachers’ cognitive and emotional development, enabled them to explore independent, self-directed learnings, fostered awareness of the interconnectedness of arts forms, and reinforced cross-curricular instruction through the arts. Such findings suggest that professional artists helping teachers to learn to teach the arts on-site through an integrated arts approach is a viable model of teacher development for improving arts instruction.

In: Perspectives on Arts Education Research in Canada, Volume 2

Abstract

This chapter formulates an alternate approach to seeking knowledge based on a melding of oral and literate traditions with that of the technologies of the electronic field. Patterns of Western thinking characterized by objectivity, the separation of parts into wholes, and the organization of hierarchical structures can no longer operate in isolation from the realities of the modem age. The electronic field has created a global village where many of the traits of oral cultures have resurfaced, such as immediacy, spontaneity and holism that have created a new dynamic in the workplace and in our nation’s schools. In our research, we need to ensure that we produce new knowledge through systematic inquiry that is both relevant to practitioners and significant for the development of the education profession in a changing and dynamic world. Responsive inquiry offers the potential for addressing this need. This research strategy operates at a meta-cognitive level and re-conceptualizes the multi-dimensional as a unified whole. It offers researchers a coherent method to respond to educational challenges and impact on the field in a significant way.

In: Perspectives on Arts Education Research in Canada, Volume 1
Chapter 10 Responsive Inquiry: Employing a Musical Metaphor to Conceptualize an Arts-Based Research Strategy for the Electronic Field

Abstract

This chapter formulates an alternate approach to seeking knowledge based on a melding of oral and literate traditions with that of the technologies of the electronic field. Patterns of Western thinking characterized by objectivity, the separation of parts into wholes, and the organization of hierarchical structures can no longer operate in isolation from the realities of the modem age. The electronic field has created a global village where many of the traits of oral cultures have resurfaced, such as immediacy, spontaneity and holism that have created a new dynamic in the workplace and in our nation’s schools. In our research, we need to ensure that we produce new knowledge through systematic inquiry that is both relevant to practitioners and significant for the development of the education profession in a changing and dynamic world. Responsive inquiry offers the potential for addressing this need. This research strategy operates at a meta-cognitive level and re-conceptualizes the multi-dimensional as a unified whole. It offers researchers a coherent method to respond to educational challenges and impact on the field in a significant way.

In: Perspectives on Arts Education Research in Canada, Volume 1