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Bertram I. Spector

Abstract

Emerging changes to post-agreement negotiation structures and actors can have important implications for the process and outcome of negotiated agreements. These innovations include the coexistence of negotiated global and regional regimes on the same policy issue, as well as civil society organizations that assert their “right to negotiate” at the domestic level to promote national compliance with regime standards and provisions. The evolution of these factors within the post-agreement negotiations of the United Nations Convention Against Corruption (UNCAC) is used as a case study. Globalization and communications technology trends play a major role in promoting these changes.

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Bertram I. Spector

In this 20th anniversary issue of International Negotiation, we reflect back on past accomplishments and look forward to new areas of inquiry. The journal has focused on promoting four goals: concentrating research attention on challenging topics through thematic issues, supporting researcher-practitioner dialogue, stimulating interdisciplinary discussion, and providing a platform for new research frameworks and approaches. The articles in this anniversary issue consider the state of the field over the past two decades, highlight critical areas that demand further attention, and offer research agendas to fill those gaps.

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Bertram I. Spector

Negotiation is becoming a more inclusive activity. More and different types of actors are taking part at national and international levels to resolve conflicts and seek agreement. At a national level, non-governmental organizations and individual citizens are partaking in mass demonstrations that often evolve into negotiation. At the international level, ngos working through issue networks have been participating more and more in formal negotiations with state parties. By reviewing several cases at these different levels, this article identifies useful questions for future research focusing on the sources of legitimacy and power of these new actors and how they are changing the organization, structure, process and outcomes of negotiation.

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Bertram I. Spector

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Bertram I. Spector

Abstract

Metaphorical reasoning can offer new perspectives on familiar or unusual ideas and things. It can be especially useful in providing new insight and understanding into a field, such as international negotiation, that is undergoing an upsurge in activity and rapid change by freeing up old conceptions and enabling creative thought. By cutting across traditional fields of study, metaphors can help to refresh and reframe the study of international negotiation and provide a new point of departure for research and practice. The role of metaphors in the physical and social sciences and how they have been employed to explain international issues is discussed. The remaining articles in this issue are introduced in relation to their metaphorical orientations.

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International Negotiation

A Journal of Theory and Practice

International Negotiation: A Journal of Theory and Practice examines negotiation from many perspectives, to explore its theoretical foundations and to promote its practical application. It addresses the processes of negotiation relating to political, security, environmental, ethnic, economic, business, legal, scientific and cultural issues and conflicts among nations, international and regional organisations, multinational corporations and other non-state parties. Conceptually, the Journal confronts the difficult task of developing interdisciplinary theories and models of the negotiation process and its desired outcome. Analytically, it publishes a broad selection of original research articles, traditional historical and case studies, and significant contributions to the expanding body of knowledge in the field. In general terms, the Journal’s practical aim is to identify, analyse and explain effective and efficient international negotiation and mediation processes that result in long-lasting, flexible and implementable solutions.

While always open to the submission of unsolicited papers, the journal also encourages proposals for thematic issues that focus on the study of particular problems.

Online submission: Articles for publication in International Negotiation can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here.

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I. William Zartman and Bertram I. Spector

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This thematic issue of the journal revisits the thesis introduced ten years ago in the book, Getting It Done: Post-Agreement Negotiation and International Regimes, that regimes are recursive negotiations and not merely one-off settlements that turn next to ratification. Seven cases are presented in the issue and discussed in this article that develop a number of reasons why regimes are marked by post-agreement negotiations. They examine the dimensions of these different types of encounters, all negotiations to be explored by established negotiation analysis but incomplete and incomprehensible without the context of the previous agreement, which then they complement.

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Bertram I. Spector and Lynn M. Wagner