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Challenges and Opportunities in Internal and External Quality Assurance
Globalization, massification of tertiary education, and ICT revolution have radically altered the tertiary education environment posing new challenges to governments, higher education providers and other key stakeholders in terms of relevance and credibility of provisions. With the radical alterations it became clear that the traditional means for internal and external evaluations are no longer adequate to ensure the acceptable level of tertiary education performance to meet the society development needs. Considering one of the primary roles of quality assurance in tertiary education is ensuring relevance and credibility of tertiary education provisions to the ever-changing needs of the macro world of industry, politics and society at large, more and more governments are currently prioritizing quality assurance to drive the required changes in governance of higher educatuon systems, mutual recognition across national borders, and accountability to the public in different parts of the world.

As part of its mission, the INQAAHE has undertaken a Global Study of both external and internal quality assurance developments worldwide in cooperation with the regional QA networks (e.g. ENQA, CANQATE, APQN, ANQAHE, CEENQA) in 2017–2018. The regions covered in this scoping study are as follows: Africa, the Arab Region, Asia-Pacific, Eastern and Western Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, and Northern America.

Global Trends in Higher Education Quality Assurance: Challenges and Opportunities in Internal and External Quality Assurance provides a comprehensive coverage of the trends and developments in higher education quality assurance as they refer to legitimacy/trust, efficiency and relevance.
In: Global Challenges, Local Responses in Higher Education
In: The European Higher Education Area
In: University Rankings, Diversity, and the New Landscape of Higher Education
In: University Rankings, Diversity, and the New Landscape of Higher Education
In: University Rankings, Diversity, and the New Landscape of Higher Education
Perspectives on a Moving Target
This volume presents the state of the art with respect to the most important elements of the Bologna process. The reflections on the past are also used to fuel the debate on the next decade.
In 2008, the Flemish Ministry of Education and Training invited the editors to produce a volume with chapters discussing topics that are deemed to be most salient in the coming decade. Based on a tentative list of themes to be covered initially suggested by the Ministry, the editors have solicited contributions from appropriate scholars, experts on the specific topics. As a result this volume contains a rich set of chapters which address the promises and perils of the Bologna process and its preliminary outcomes. A difficult task, given that the process is a target on the move and even changing in nature during the process. It is also a difficult task because evidence can be interpreted differently paving the way for new paradoxes and complex interactions between the actors in the field. Consequently we are faced with new questions every time we believe answers to old questions have been found. The contributors to the volume not necessarily agree in their analyses of the Bologna process, but there is—nevertheless—a fair amount of consensus. According to their analyses governance, quality, mobility and diversity are the topics that have been most important to the Bologna process in the past, and will be at centre stage in future discussions.
The book is meant to be a reflective exercise for those involved—in whatever way—in the Bologna process (researchers, teachers, managers, political decision-makers). The material is also relevant to those outside of the countries currently subscribing to the Bologna process. .
Abstract This chapter examines the ways that the third mission is reflected in university strategic plans and compares these strategies between ranked and unranked institutions. Based on over 70 university strategic plans across over 30 countries, the findings identify notable differentiation between ranked and unranked universities. Ranked universities’ strategic plans with regard to their third mission are mostly globally and regionally contextualized, while unranked institutions are more frequently mentioned and more locally oriented.
In: World-Class Universities
In: The European Higher Education Area
In: The European Higher Education Area