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Author: Boris Liebrenz

Abstract

Wetzstein’s dealings with books during his tenure as consul in Damascus (1849–1863) are dominated by manuscripts which he bought in large quantities and sold to several collections in Germany. But he also attempted to promote the transmission of printed books in the other direction at the instigation of his academic teacher, Heinrich Leberecht Fleischer. His trading activity can shed light on the consul’s self-image and self-representation, as well as on the cultural networks that he managed to maintain in Damascus and the region. It also reveals some of the obstacles that the products of European academia in particular and printed books in general could face in late Ottoman Syria, which was still largely dominated by manuscripts. The failure of Wetzstein’s attempts will be viewed within the context of the early reception and production of printed books in the region.

In: Manuscripts, Politics and Oriental Studies
Author: Boris Liebrenz

Abstract

Wetzstein’s dealings with books during his tenure as consul in Damascus (1849–1863) are dominated by manuscripts which he bought in large quantities and sold to several collections in Germany. But he also attempted to promote the transmission of printed books in the other direction at the instigation of his academic teacher, Heinrich Leberecht Fleischer. His trading activity can shed light on the consul’s self-image and self-representation, as well as on the cultural networks that he managed to maintain in Damascus and the region. It also reveals some of the obstacles that the products of European academia in particular and printed books in general could face in late Ottoman Syria, which was still largely dominated by manuscripts. The failure of Wetzstein’s attempts will be viewed within the context of the early reception and production of printed books in the region.

In: Manuscripts, Politics and Oriental Studies
In: Historical Aspects of Printing and Publishing in Languages of the Middle East
Eine Privatbibliothek im osmanischen Syrien und ihr kulturelles Umfeld
Author: Boris Liebrenz
In Die Rifāʽīya spürt Boris Liebrenz der Buchkultur des Osmanischen Syrien (16. - 19. Jahrhundert) durch den Fokus der einzig überlebenden Privatbibliothek der Epoche nach. Er fragt nach der Produktion und Transmission von Wissen sowie dem sozialen Hintergrund der Leserschaft im Zeitalter der Handschrift. Studien der arabischen Bibliotheksgeschichte haben oft nur das Mittelalter in den Blick genommen und basierten fast ausschließlich auf literarischen Quellen. Dies ist die erste Monographie, die eine einzige Region während der Osmanischen Periode in den Fokus nimmt und deren auf uns gekommene Handschriften und Notizen ihrer Leser und Besitzer systematisch als dokumentarische Quelle benutzt. So erhellt sie die materiellen, rechtlichen und sozialen Voraussetzungen von Buchbesitz und Lesepraxis.

In Die Rifāʽīya Boris Liebrenz explores the book culture of Ottoman Syria (16th to 19th century), using the only surviving Damascene private library of the time as a vantage point. He asks about the production and transmission of knowledge as well as the social background of the reading audience in a manuscript age.
Scholarship on Arabic libraries has often focussed on the medieval period and relied nearly exclusively on literary accounts. This is the first book-length study that focuses on a single region in the Ottoman period and systematically uses the vast number of surviving manuscripts as a documentary source by means of the notes left by their readers and possessors. Thus, it sheds light on the material, juridical, and social basis of book-ownership and reading.

Author: Boris Liebrenz
Arab Traders in their Own Words explores for the first time the largest unified corpus of merchant correspondence to have survived from the Ottoman period. The writers chosen for this first volume were mostly Christian merchants who traded within a network that connected the Syrian and Egyptian provinces and extended from Damascus in the North to Alexandria in the South with particular centers in Jerusalem and Damietta. They lived through one of the most turbulent intersections of Ottoman and European imperial history, the 1790s and early 1800s, and had to navigate their fortunes through diplomacy, culture, and commerce. Besides an edition of more than 190 letters in colloquial Arabic this volume also offers a profound introductory study.
In: Die Rifāʽīya aus Damaskus
In: Die Rifāʽīya aus Damaskus
In: Die Rifāʽīya aus Damaskus
In: Die Rifāʽīya aus Damaskus
In: Die Rifāʽīya aus Damaskus