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Author: Bos
This work by Qusṭā Ibn Lūqā, the only known health guide for the pilgrim to Mecca, discusses in a concise and logical manner the best regime for the traveller, the diseases which may befall him and their treatment. It is an eloquent witness to the author's profound knowledge of the works of ancient physicians, especially those of the Byzantine physician Paul of Aegina. After an exposition of the best regimen for the traveller, Qusṭā mentions the different diseases which may befall him, namely, fatigue, earache, diseases of the bronchial tubes and those caused by dust. Recommended remedies are simple and compound drugs, bathing and massage. Qusṭā then discusses criteria to determine the quality of water, means to improve bad water, and means to quench one's thirst. In the next chapters Qusṭā treats the prophylaxis against vermin and the treatment of stings and bites caused by them. After a lucid exposition of spontaneous generation, Qusṭā concludes his treatise by discussing the occurrence of the Dracunculus medinensis and its treatment.
Critical Edition of the Arabic Text with English Translation, and Critical Edition of Moses ibn Tibbon’s Hebrew Translation (Ṣedat ha-Derakhim)
Editor / Translator: Gerrit Bos
The medical compendium entitled Zād al-musāfir wa-qūt al-ḥāḍir ( Provisions for the Traveller and the Nourishment for the Sedentary) and compiled by Ibn al-Jazzār from Qayrawān in the tenth century is one of the most influential medical handbooks in the history of western medicine. In the eleventh century, Constantine the African translated it into Latin; this translation was the basis for the commentaries by the Salernitan masters from the twelfth century on, and was popular in Jewish circles as well, as is attested by the fact that it was translated into Hebrew three times. The current volume covers Book 7, chapters seven to thirty of Ibn al-Jazzār’s compendium. These chapters cover a wide variety of external afflictions such as measles and smallpox; bites and stings; rabies; tumours; warts and calluses, leprosy, scurf and eczema, pruritus and scabies, furuncles, scrofula, sharā and heat rashes; fractures and dislocations; haemorrhages caused by a sword, knife or arrow; whiteness of the nails and paronychia; burns; wounds caused by pressure from the shoes; and fissures in the hands and feet.
Author: Gerrit Bos
This volume is part of a wider project aiming at mapping the technical medical terminology as it features in medieval Hebrew medical works, especially those terms that do not feature in the current dictionaries at all, or insufficiently. In this way the author hopes to facilitate the consultation of these and other medical works and the identification of anonymous medical material. The terminology discussed in this volume has been derived from three primary and seven secondary sources. The primary sources are: (1) Sefer Ṣedat ha-Derakhim – Moses Ibn Tibbon’s translation of Ibn al-Jazzār’s Zād al-musāfir, bks. 1–2; (2) Sefer ha-Shimmush – Shem Tov Ben Isaac’s Hebrew translation of al-Zahrāwī’s Kitāb al-taṣrīf; (3) Sefer ha-Qanun – Nathan ha-Meʾati’s Hebrew translation of the first book of Ibn Sīnā’s K. al-Qānūn.
In: ʿUbaidallāh Ibn Buḫtīšūʿ on Apparent Death