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  • Author or Editor: Brian Madigan x
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The well-known formats of Roman sculpture are the ones best preserved, but inevitably limited to those designed to be permanent and immobile. A significant component of the Roman visual world missing from this record are those images which depict or stand in for the Roman gods during ceremonies. Statuary of this type is in some measure mobile, designed specifically to be carried about in processions, brought out for public viewing at throne ceremonies, or participate in divine banquets. In addition to defining the characteristics of these ceremonial sculptures, this study also addresses their performative qualities: where and how they appeared, who was responsible for handling them, with what conventions of decorum, and with what response from the audience.
Author:
Andrea Fulvio’s Illustrium imagines and the Beginnings of Classical Archaeology is a study of the book recognized by contemporaries as the first attempt (1517) to publish artifacts from Classical Antiquity in the form of a chronology of portraits appearing on coins. By studying correspondences between the illustrated coins and genuine, ancient coins, Madigan parses Fulvio’s methodology, showing how he attempted to exploit coins as historical documents. Situated within humanist literary and historical studies of ancient Rome, his numismatic project required visual artists closely to study and assimilate the conventions of ancient portraiture. The Illustrium imagines exemplifies the range and complexity of early modern responses to ancient artifacts.
Author:
The collection of Greek vases in the Detroit Institute of Arts has been compiled over the course of the twentieth century to reflect the range of painting styles and shapes which characterize the period from the eighth through fourth centuries B.C. This catalogue is the first publication of that collection, comprising those vases from Corinth and Athens with painted decoration. The physical and painted characteristics of each vase are recorded, with an attribution to a painter or group, and a date. The relationship of the painted decoration to other Greek painted vases, religious or social institutions is discussed. The catalogue will be of interest to specialists in Greek vase painting, and those interested in Greek art and its modern collecting.
In: Andrea Fulvio’s Illustrium imagines and the Beginnings of Classical Archaeology
In: Andrea Fulvio’s Illustrium imagines and the Beginnings of Classical Archaeology
In: Andrea Fulvio’s Illustrium imagines and the Beginnings of Classical Archaeology