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Charles Hunt and Bryn Hughes

Abstract

Although the 'rule of law' is now widely recognised as indispensable to effective peace operations, its delineation remains elusive. Researchers contest its substance while those most responsible for its implementation (e. g. the United Nations) promulgate only abstract notions needed to inform detailed decisions. At its worst, this means that competing reform activities undermine each other, making long term success less likely. The questions we address are about the deficiencies in how rule of law is conceived. Particular attention is paid to the little recognised assumption that the Weberian state ideal corresponds to the societies on the receiving end of international interventions. After a review of extant academic and practitioner viewpoints, we set out a postWeberian framework which expands the dominant imagination to include non-state rule of law 'providers'. We argue that the optimum sources for immediate yet sustainable rule of law solutions may often be those which bear little resemblance to the conventional state-based providers that populate mainstream conceptions.

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Charles Hunta and Bryn Hughes

The increasing centrality of police in peace and capacity building operations suggests that the need for incisive assessments of their impact has never been greater. This means that the manner in which input data is aggregated matters integrally since irrelevant perspectives, such as national trends for a localised program, produce irrelevant, or worse misleading, conclusions. Currently, however, common practice is to rely on either patchy anecdotal evidence of practitioners or the acumen of particular analysts, which invariably reflects their organisational biases. The purpose of this article is to engage this problem – in the context of international policing – so that selecting the most meaningful viewpoints and information is not left to chance. We develop a framework which systematises the many nuanced yet crucial forms of disaggregation for monitoring and evaluation. Assessment analyses informed by this framework can therefore go a long way to achieving their main purpose: ensuring more efficient and effective international policing going forward.

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Edited by Bryn Hughes, Charles T. Hunt and Boris Kondoch

The realm of international peace and capacity development operations is a critical and contested space. The international community has increasingly focused on this area, relying upon these endeavours to not only bring lasting peace, but also to provide sustainable development for some of the most troubled places on earth. Efforts to date have failed to meet expectations. The nexus between practitioners and those whose job it is to theorise ways to improve practice is deficient.

Making Sense of Peace and Capacity-Building Operations was derived from an international workshop which brought these often disconnected communities together. Taking on the breadth of issues across the security-development spectrum, this volume challenges much of the heretofore conventional wisdom on the topic, while also pointing to ways in which improvements can be realised in this crucial space.
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Bryn Hughes, Charles T. Hunt and Jodie Curth-Bibb

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Bryn Hughes, Charles T. Hunt and Jodie Curth-Bibb

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Bryn Hughes, Charles T. Hunt and Jodie Curth-Bibb

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Bryn Hughes, Charles T. Hunt and Jodie Curth-Bibb