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A Global Approach to Spaces, Representations and Worlds of Trade, 1500–1800
Hans Holbein’s Triumphs (1532-1534), commissioned for the headquarters of the Hanseatic League in London and Kano Naizen’s The Portuguese namban (‘foreigners’) painted in 1543 in Japan are representations of worlds of trade, where wealth, speculation, exploitation, poverty, curiosity, encounters and the exotic relate effortlessly. These worlds multiplied in Africa, the America’s, Asia and Europe as mercantile cultures met in a globalizing world. From these encounters, power, subjugation and conflict arose as part of the same world as cooperation, cross-culturalism and cosmopolitism. Understanding early modern merchant cultures is thus paramount to comprehend the sinews of globalization before 1800.

Merchants worldwide shared trading interests. These interests shaped a panoply of encounters of mercantile cultures across space and time. This book sketches the commonalities and underlines the differences of mercantile practices and representations during the Early Modern period.

Contributors are: Laurence Fontaine, David Graizbord, William Pettigrew, Edmond J. Smith, Radhika Seshan, Rila Mukherjee, Jurre J. A. Knoest, Noelle Richardson, Joseph P. McDermott, Mark Harberlëin, Francisco Bethencourt, Edgar Pereira, and Germano Maifreda.
Volume Editors: Cátia A.P. Antunes and Amelia Polónia
Beyond Empires explores the complexity of empire building from the point of view of self-organized networks, rather than from the point of view of the central state. This focus takes readers into a world of cooperative strategies worldwide that emphasises the role played by individuals, rather than institutions, in the overseas expansion and consequent development of European empires. While unveiling the practices and mechanisms of cooperation between individuals, this volume show cases the role played by individuals for the creation, development and maintenance of self-organized networks in the Early Modern period. Applying new conceptual and theoretical inputs, this book values the contributions of different ‘worlds’, bringing to the fore the interactions of Europeans and non-Europeans, Christians and non-Christians, people living within-, on- or just outside the border of empire.
Author: Cátia Antunes

Abstract

This article traces the multiplex relationships established between Portuguese ambassadors, consuls and extraordinary envoys in the Dutch Republic between 1640 and 1703 with the Portuguese kingdom, the king, the Portuguese “Nation” in Amsterdam and the Dutch States General. In negotiating multiple contracts and treaties regarding “world peace,” these men determined the course of history not so much because they were bound by the service of a state or a king but rather because they served a multiplicity of interests that often damaged national interest in favor of specific interest groups. The article focuses particularly on the Dutch-Portuguese clashes in Western Africa and Brazil and how their settlements impacted the Dutch-Portuguese power sharing in Asia, ultimately challenging premises of sovereignty at a global scale.

In: Journal of Early Modern History
European Expansion and Indigenous Response is a peer-reviewed book series that seeks to understand the process of European expansion, interchange and connectivity in a global context in the early modern and modern period. It will seek to understand this transformative process and period in cultural, economic, social, and ideological terms in Africa, the Indian Ocean, Central and East Asia and the Pacific Rim. This series will provide a forum for varied scholarly work - original monographs, article collections, editions of primary sources translations - on these exciting global mixtures and their impact on culture, politics and society in the period from the Portuguese navigators of the late fifteenth century until the end of ‘Company’ rule in British India in the mid-nineteenth century. It will move beyond the traditional isolated and nation bound historiographical emphases of this field which have isolated continents and nation-states and toward a broader intellectual terrain, encouraging whenever possible non-European perspectives. It will also encourage a wider disciplinary approach to early modern studies. Themes in this series will include the exchange of ideas and products, especially through the medium of trading companies; the exchange of religions and traditions; the transfer of technologies; the development of new forms of political, social and economic policy, as well as identity formation. It will seek out studies that employ diverse forms of analysis from all scholarly disciplines, including anthropology, archaeology, art history, history, (including the history of science), linguistics, literature, music, philosophy, and religious studies. In addition, it will include works translated from French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to either the series editor George Bryan Souza or the Publisher at Brill Wendel Scholma.


Brill Open offers you the choice to make your research freely accessible online in exchange for a Publication Charge. This can be by choice or to comply with funding mandates or university requirements. Brill offers various options of Open Access; for more information please go to the Brill Open webpage.

The series published an average of 2,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.