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  • Author or Editor: Carine Juvin x
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Abstract

This article presents a Mamluk Qurʾān ǧuzʾ copied in Cairo in the late 14th century, newly acquired by the Musée du Louvre. It is an interesting example of manuscript production in this period and well contextualized thanks to its informative colophon. It can be linked with other volumes of the same Qurʾān now in Cairo and Brussels. This manuscript was acquired together with some documents (two letters, a note and a watercolour) revealing information about its circulation in the 19th century and connecting it with the amīr ʿAbd al-Qādir al-Ǧazāʾirī and the French orientalist Léon Roches.

In: Journal of Islamic Manuscripts
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Abstract

A few artefacts can be connected to mediaeval Syria, and more specifically Damascus, through their inscriptions because they mention the city as a place of manufacture or name an individual who lived there. This is notably the case for two hitherto neglected inscribed objects in the Musée du Louvre, dating to the Mamluk sultanate, which are studied in this article: an enamelled glass lamp and a metal drum. New identifications of their recipients, documented through historical sources, bring light to their particular stories and provide new references for studying the material and social culture during this period.

Open Access
In: Journal of Material Cultures in the Muslim World
In: Journal of Material Cultures in the Muslim World

Résumé

Cette courte note présente une inscription inédite : un fragment de stèle funéraire tunisienne datable du v e/xi e s. Le fragment a été découvert dans les eaux du port de Calvi en Corse en 1969. L’épitaphe, le style épigraphique et le décor sont replacés au sein de la production tunisienne et principalement kairouanaise. Ce fragment vient s’ajouter à d’autres stèles musulmanes médiévales découvertes dans le sud de la France, qui témoignent des échanges entre les deux régions de la Méditerranée et des remplois insolites de ces pierres funéraires.

In: Arabica