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Abstract

J. T. Fraser highlighted the distinctive connections between the different levels of temporality that characterize the human timescape. In this context, he also demonstrated a clear awareness of the relationship between sociotemporality and the existential processing of time. Human experience, in its myriad expressions, bears the mark of the social processes and dynamics within which it takes shape. Analyzing this relationship, we can assert that identity itself is marked by the conception of time that characterizes a given historical period. Processes of social change, forms of experience, identities and expressions of subjectivity are therefore interwoven. The ways in which we experience and conceive of time should therefore also be interpreted in the light of this interconnection. In this particular period, information technologies appear to have the power to redefine the whole of human experience, including our experience of time. After analyzing the close relationship between time and identity, and the multiplicity of temporal dimensions it comprises, referencing social phenomenology, the paper explores the nature of the processes of change that characterize our era—starting from the crisis of the future and the dynamics connected to the acceleration of time. The general aim is to highlight the link between historical times, social times and individual times. It looks at the reflection formulated by J. T. Fraser on the multiplicity of times as it relates to the analytical tools developed by the sociology of time.

In: KronoScope
In: Youth, Space and Time
In: Youth, Space and Time
Agoras and Chronotopes in the Global City
This book engages with the experience of space and time in youth cultures across the world. Putting together contemporary case studies on young transnationalists, young glocals and young protesters in cities on the five continents, it analyzes new agoras and chronotopes in global cities. It is based on a selection of papers first presented to the International Sociological Association (ISA) Research Committee 34 session on Youth Cultures, Space and Time that took place during the ISA World Congresses of Sociology in Gothenburg, Sweden (2010), and in Yokohama, Japan (2014). The value of this volume for youth researchers worldwide is twofold. Firstly, the chapters exemplify innovative approaches to understanding the fluid and dynamic urban space-time dimension in which young people’s cultural and bodily practices are located. Secondly, the volume offers a transnational perspective. Chapter contributors come from countries across the world, and give account of very diverse youth culture phenomena. They represent both established researchers and new voices in youth research.

Contributors are: Óscar Aguilera Ruiz, Ilenya Camozzi, Carles Feixa, Vitor Sérgio Ferreira, Liliana Galindo Ramírez, Elham Golpoush-Nezhad, Leila Jeolás, Jeffrey J. Juris, Hagen Kordes, Sofia Laine, Carmen Leccardi, Pam Nilan, Jordi Nofre, Ndukaeze Nwabueze, Luca Queirolo Palmas, Yannis Pechtelidis, Geoffrey Pleyers, José Sánchez García, Mahmood Shahabi.
In: Youth, Space and Time
In: Youth, Space and Time
In: Youth, Space and Time
In: Youth, Space and Time
In: Youth, Space and Time