Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 19 items for

  • Author or Editor: Caroline Mannweiler x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All

Abstract

The role of France as antagonist in the formation of German nationalism is of crucial importance in the timespan between 1756 and 1871. A particularly interesting genre in this context are travel reports from Germans visiting Paris. This chapter focuses on two such reports: the letters from Paris by Heinrich von Kleist (1801) and the “Journey to France” (1803) by Friedrich Schlegel. As a comparison of both reports shows, Kleist and Schlegel share a similar diagnosis of their urban experience, in which Paris becomes the symptom of a general tendency of the age, i.e. the advent of a modern capitalistic society. However, the critique raised by the authors of this general tendency does not adopt a transnational perspective, but rather serves the construction of concepts of Germanness as opposed to both France and modern society. Yet despite these similarities, the reports also show significant differences: While Kleist takes his estrangement from Paris as proof of a fundamental feeling of non-belonging, typical of Romanticism as antithesis to modernity, Schlegel transforms his critique of Paris into a call for a new Germany that he outlines in his journal Europa. Thus, Schlegel’s more nationally oriented reaction participates in the very logic of commodification and competition it sets out to critique.

In: Nationalism before the Nation State
In: L’éthique beckettienne et sa réalisation dans la forme
In: L’éthique beckettienne et sa réalisation dans la forme
In: L’éthique beckettienne et sa réalisation dans la forme
In: L’éthique beckettienne et sa réalisation dans la forme
In: L’éthique beckettienne et sa réalisation dans la forme
In: L’éthique beckettienne et sa réalisation dans la forme
In: L’éthique beckettienne et sa réalisation dans la forme
In: L’éthique beckettienne et sa réalisation dans la forme
In: L’éthique beckettienne et sa réalisation dans la forme