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Abstract:

This chapter considers Richard Shusterman’s claim in his “The Silent, Limping Body of Philosophy” that Friedrich Nietzsche’s work constitutes a mere inversion of the mind-body hierarchy, by providing an interpretation of selections from the Nietzschean corpus. The aim of the chapter is to show that Nietzsche’s position on the self is able to avoid falling into the “logic of reversal” that Shusterman diagnoses in his thinking. The chapter’s arguments then provide support for the conclusion that Nietzsche’s writings on the singing, dancing body could be seen as an example of a (proto-) phenomenology, and indeed, a (proto-) somaesthetics.

In: Aesthetic Experience and Somaesthetics
Volume Editor: Catherine F. Botha
In African Somaesthetics: Cultures, Feminisms, Politics, Catherine F. Botha brings together original research on the body in African cultures, specifically interrogating the possibilities of the contribution of a somaesthetic approach in the context of colonization, decolonization, and globalization in Africa.

The innovative contributions that consider the somaesthetic dimensions of experience in the context of Africa (centred broadly around the themes of politics, feminisms, and cultures) reflect a diversity of perspectives and positions. The book is a first of its kind in gathering together novel and focused analyses of the body as conceived of from an African perspective.

Abstract

This chapter is a transcription of an interview of Leonard Harris on his ground-breaking work on necro-being by Catherine Botha.

In: African Somaesthetics: Cultures, Feminisms, Politics
In: African Somaesthetics: Cultures, Feminisms, Politics
In: African Somaesthetics: Cultures, Feminisms, Politics

Abstract

In this introductory chapter to the collection, Catherine Botha explores the major themes that are covered in the volume, and links them to the idea of an African somaesthetics as provocation. She explores how the work of one contemporary South African artist, Nandipha Mntambo, and specifically her Europa (2012) can be read as a somaesthetic commentary on the way in which bodies are subject to the male, white gaze in the context of the colonial past and present.

In: African Somaesthetics: Cultures, Feminisms, Politics
In: African Somaesthetics: Cultures, Feminisms, Politics
In: African Somaesthetics: Cultures, Feminisms, Politics