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Abstract This chapter analyses the representation of the Allied intervention in Siberia (1918–1920) during the Russian Civil War in the first two novels of William Gerhardie (1895–1977), Futility (1922) and The Polyglots (1925). This inglorious episode offered Gerhardie a fitting subject for comic treatment and exposure of the absurdity of war and the futility of intervention. The central argument of the chapter is that, although military action takes place off-stage, the two novels in their own idiosyncratic way belong to the category of war literature. The narrators, British officers posted in Siberia whose lives and those of their friends and relatives seem infinitely remote from the hardships of war, adopt an anti-heroic and self-ironic perspective. Although humour constitutes the prevailing mode through which the chaotic Russian situation and fictional family dramas are filtered, Gerhardie’s horror of warfare comes to the surface in the narrators’ and characters’ sarcastic anti-war diatribes.
In: Representing Wars from 1860 to the Present
In: Representing Wars from 1860 to the Present
Fields of Action, Fields of Vision
Representing Wars from 1860 to the Present examines representations of war in literature, film, photography, memorials, and the popular press. The volume breaks new ground in cutting across disciplinary boundaries and offering case studies on a wide variety of fields of vision and action, and types of conflict: from civil wars in the USA, Spain, Russia and the Congo to recent western interventions in Afghanistan and Iraq. In the case of World War Two, Representing Wars emphasises idiosyncratic and non-western perspectives – specifically those of Japanese writers Hayashi and Ooka.
A central concern of the thirteen contributors has been to investigate the ethical and ideological implications of specific representational choices.

Contributors are: Claire Bowen, Catherine Ann Collins, Marie-France Courriol, Éliane Elmaleh, Teresa Gibert, William Gleeson, Catherine Hoffmann, Sandrine Lascaux, Christopher Lloyd, Monica Michlin, Guillaume Muller, Misako Nemoto, Clément Sigalas.
In: Representing Wars from 1860 to the Present
In: Representing Wars from 1860 to the Present
In: Representing Wars from 1860 to the Present
In: Representing Wars from 1860 to the Present
In: Representing Wars from 1860 to the Present
Schreibszenen in Bewegung zwischen Peripatetik und Mobiltelefon
In kultur- und medienwissenschaftlicher Orientierung fragt der Band nach einer Genealogie des mobilen, multifunktionalen Telefons, indem die Mobilisierung einzelner Aufzeichnungsmedien, wie Notizbuch, Fotoapparat, Filmkamera oder Tonbandgerät in den Blick genommen werden. Das Mobiltelefon entwickelt sich zu einem verschiedene Einzelmedien verschmelzende Hybridmedium bzw. vernetzten Kleincomputer, der eine Vielzahl wählbarer Funktionen in sich vereint und für unterwegs bereitstellt.