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Author: Hunt Charles T.

Abstract

Growing international solidarity for protection principles has formed the backdrop for an evolving notion of human protection at the un in the post-Cold War era. The emergence of the ‘Human Rights up Front’ initiative, protection of children and Women, Peace and Security policy agendas, and normative frameworks such as the protection of civilians and the Responsibility to Protect are indicative of a tangible human protection agenda at the un. However, the extent to which human protection norms have diffused in different regions vary in important ways. Africa – one region or many – has been a norm maker, shaper and taker, as well as a major recipient of action in accordance with this nascent normative regime. This chapter provides an overview of regionalism in Africa and examines how perspectives and institutional expressions at the regional level(s) have been influenced by – and in turn influenced – the uptake and development of norms around human protection.

In: Regionalism and Human Protection
Author: Charles T. Hunt

Growing international solidarity for protection principles has formed the backdrop for an evolving notion of human protection at the un in the post-Cold War era. The emergence of the ‘Human Rights up Front’ initiative, protection of children and Women, Peace and Security policy agendas, and normative frameworks such as the protection of civilians and the Responsibility to Protect are indicative of a tangible human protection agenda at the un. However, the extent to which human protection norms have diffused in different regions vary in important ways. Africa – one region or many – has been a norm maker, shaper and taker, as well as a major recipient of action in accordance with this nascent normative regime. This article provides an overview of regionalism in Africa and examines how perspectives and institutional expressions at the regional level(s) have been influenced by – and in turn influenced – the uptake and development of norms around human protection.

In: Global Responsibility to Protect

The Protection of Civilians (PoC) has been part of United Nations (UN) peace operations for twenty years. Today, PoC is irrefutably a ‘centre of gravity’ for how UN peace operations see and portray themselves. Despite negative perceptions, a great deal of progress has been made in how missions prepare for and respond to the demands of protection mandates. For the vulnerable populations they serve, mandates to protect raise expectations and provide hope that peacekeepers will safeguard them. Yet efforts to implement PoC mandates have encountered a range of problems, which peace operations have struggled to address. This article critically reflects on the past two decades of promoting, planning for and practicing protection in UN peace operations. It argues that while the achievements are many, significant challenges remain and much more must be done to deliver on this cardinal obligation.

In: Journal of International Peacekeeping
Reflections from Southeast Asia and Africa
This book provides a detailed examination of how norms concerning human rights, civilian protection and prevention of mass atrocities have fared in the regions of Southeast Asia and Africa. Originated as a spin off of the journal GR2P (vol. 8/2-3, 2016), it has been enriched with new chapters and revised contents, which contrast the different experiences of those regions and investigates the expression of human protection norms in regional organisations and thematic policy agendas as well as the role of civil society mechanisms/processes. Hunt and Morada have brought together scholar-practitioners from across the world.The collection identifies a range of insights that provide rich opportunities for south-south exchange and mutual learning when it comes to promoting and building capacity for human protection at the regional level.
The realm of international peace and capacity development operations is a critical and contested space. The international community has increasingly focused on this area, relying upon these endeavours to not only bring lasting peace, but also to provide sustainable development for some of the most troubled places on earth. Efforts to date have failed to meet expectations. The nexus between practitioners and those whose job it is to theorise ways to improve practice is deficient.
Making Sense of Peace and Capacity-Building Operations was derived from an international workshop which brought these often disconnected communities together. Taking on the breadth of issues across the security-development spectrum, this volume challenges much of the heretofore conventional wisdom on the topic, while also pointing to ways in which improvements can be realised in this crucial space.
In: Regionalism and Human Protection
In: Regionalism and Human Protection
In: Global Responsibility to Protect

Abstract

This short article introduces the forum on the Uighur population in China and R2P. It provides context to demonstrate why it is important to analyse the current situation in Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region of China through an R2P lens and states the objectives of the forum. It then provides a brief summary of the contributions in the forum that take into account the domestic context, legal arguments and analysis of the international political context in which R2P is operationalised.

In: Global Responsibility to Protect

Abstract

This short article introduces the GR2P Forum reflecting on the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) doctrine 15 years after it was institutionalised at the international level through the World Summit Outcome Document. It contextualises the relevance of critical reflections on the R2P at its 15th anniversary and then lays out the aims and objectives of the Forum. It provides an overview of the different contributions, describing the perspectives of the authors and the key arguments they present.

In: Global Responsibility to Protect