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In: Transatlantic Revolutionary Cultures, 1789-1861

Using transmediality as an approach to analyse the use of symbols in Anglo-American protest culture during the 1760s and 1770s sheds new light on the process of creating ideological alliances and the making of meaning. In the same way written text created a shared realm of ideas even as they were read and reinterpreted in accordance with different political and social contexts, visual templates, for example in carricature, also featured as points of reference. Relating these images to performances of protest and objects from a material culture of revolution brings together forms of resistance that have previously been examined separately. Arguably, by using a shared arsenal of symbolism protesters identified with an imagined community that in reality was never socially or politically coherent.

In: Journal of Early American History
In: Transatlantic Revolutionary Cultures, 1789-1861
In: Transatlantic Revolutionary Cultures, 1789-1861
In: Transatlantic Revolutionary Cultures, 1789-1861
Transatlantic Revolutionary Cultures, 1789-1861 argues that the revolutionary era constituted a coherent chapter in transatlantic history and that individual revolutions were connected to a broader, transatlantic and transnational frame. As a composite, the essays place instances of political upheaval during the long nineteenth century in Europe and the Americas in a common narrative and offer a new interpretation on their seeming asynchrony. In the age of revolutions the formation of political communities and cultural interactions were closely connected over time and space. Reciprocal connections arose from discussions on the nature of history, deliberations about constitutional models, as well as the reception of revolutions in popular culture. These various levels of cultural and intellectual interchange we term “transatlantic revolutionary cultures.”

Contributors are: Ulrike Bock, Anne Bruch, Peter Fischer, Mischa Honeck, Raphael Hörmann, Charlotte A. Lerg, Marc H. Lerner, Michael L. Miller, Timothy Mason Roberts, and Heléna Tóth.