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Author: Chee-Beng Tan
Based on long-term ethnographic study, this is the first comprehensive work on the Chinese popular religion in Malaysia. It analyses temples and communities in historical and contemporary perspective, the diversity of deities and Chinese speech groups, religious specialists and temple services, the communal significance of the Hungry Ghosts Festival, the relationship between religion and philanthropy as seen through the lens of such Chinese religious organization as shantang (benevolent halls) and Dejiao (Moral Uplifting Societies), as well as the development and transformation of Taoist Religion. Highly informative, this concise book contributes to an understanding of Chinese migration and settlement, political economy and religion, religion and identity politics as well the significance of religion to both individuals and communities.
Author: Tan Chee-Beng

Abstract

This paper discusses the types of Chinese identities in Malaysia, which have been influenced by localization — the process of becoming local, involving cultural adjustment to a local geographical and social environment as well as identifying with the locality. The important role of socialization in ethnic identification is discussed, illustrated by the experience of the Malay-speaking Chinese called Baba. The Chinese in Malaysia are both ethnic Chinese (Huaren) and Malaysians. As Huaren, they are both territorially bounded as Chinese Malaysians and unbounded as transnational Chinese. Ethnic Chinese identities are both bounded and unbounded. The bounded identity as Malaysians of Chinese origin reflects the diverse localization experience of the Chinese.

In: Asian Journal of Social Science
In: Chinatowns around the World
In: Chinese Religion in Malaysia
In: Chinese Religion in Malaysia
In: Chinese Religion in Malaysia
In: Chinese Religion in Malaysia