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In: Self-Study Research Methodologies for Teacher Educators
In: Self-Study Research Methodologies for Teacher Educators
Series Editors: Juanjo Mena, Ruth Kane, and Cheryl J. Craig
The ISATT conference series represents an effort to compile international research and practices on Teacher Education. It draws upon a variety of educational approaches, procedures, and teaching contexts where the field takes form. The aims and scope of the ISATT book series is to promote and bring together the best papers presented at the Biennial conferences of the association. The ISATT’s main goal is to increase insights into the identity, role, contexts and work of teachers, and the process of teaching.
In: Beyond the One Room School
Chapter 1 The Impact of Reform Policies on Teachers and Their Practices

Abstract

Educational reform tops the world agenda. Since the introduction of international testing programs (i.e., PISA), nations have competed with one another to gain international prominence. Educational improvement has become a $2-trillion business annually. Policymakers are seeking to find the next-best thing to lift local and national scores. Their mandates, however, can only be realized by teachers who, by law, must implement them. For their part, teachers want to be curriculum makers, not curriculum implementers, enacting others’ demands. They know that policies cannot be implemented cleanly due to human and contextual complexities. In this chapter, researchers from four countries (Brazil, Canada, Portugal, United States) each introduce one or more recent reform policies that were adopted and illuminate how it/they affected local teachers and their practices in unanticipated ways.

In: Education beyond Crisis

Abstract

Educational reform tops the world agenda. Since the introduction of international testing programs (i.e., PISA), nations have competed with one another to gain international prominence. Educational improvement has become a $2-trillion business annually. Policymakers are seeking to find the next-best thing to lift local and national scores. Their mandates, however, can only be realized by teachers who, by law, must implement them. For their part, teachers want to be curriculum makers, not curriculum implementers, enacting others’ demands. They know that policies cannot be implemented cleanly due to human and contextual complexities. In this chapter, researchers from four countries (Brazil, Canada, Portugal, United States) each introduce one or more recent reform policies that were adopted and illuminate how it/they affected local teachers and their practices in unanticipated ways.

In: Education beyond Crisis