Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for

  • Author or Editor: Chris Reyns-Chikuma x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All

Abstract

Frans Masereel began his career in Belgium during the early 1910s mainly as a book illustrator. At the onslaught of WWI, he had to flee Belgium and take refuge in Geneva because he was a convinced pacifist. Due to Swiss neutrality, Geneva was at that time a city where potentially persecuted intellectuals and artists from both sides of the conflict could live in peace, even if often in poverty. These artists created a small international community where, in spite of some tensions, they were very supportive of each other. Flemish but French speaking (e.g., he gave all his books French titles), influenced by German expressionism but trained more within the French graphic tradition (e.g., Les Livres d’heures), Masereel was an internationalist by both his education and his belief. In Geneva, he met and deepened his friendship with many artists and intellectuals like the Austrian-Jewish cosmopolitan Stefan Zweig. Using the latter’s writing and other Viennese comments on Masereel, I will try to understand why Zweig was so interested and so instrumental in helping the Belgian artist become one of the precursors of the new art of the graphic novel in the 20th century.

In: Brussels 1900 Vienna
In: Brussels 1900 Vienna
In: Brussels 1900 Vienna
In: Brussels 1900 Vienna
In: Brussels 1900 Vienna
In: Brussels 1900 Vienna
In: Brussels 1900 Vienna
This co-edited volume offers new insights into the complex relations between Brussels and Vienna in the turn-of-the-century period (1880-1930). Through archival research and critical methods of cultural transfer as a network, it contributes to the study of Modernism in all its complexity.
Seventeen chapters analyse the interconnections between new developments in literature (Verhaeren, Musil, Zweig), drama (Maeterlinck, Schnitzler, Hofmannsthal), visual arts (Minne, Khnopff, Masereel, Child Art), architecture (Hoffmann, Van de Velde), music (Schönberg, Ysaÿe, Kreisler, Kolisch), as well as psychoanalysis (Varendonck, Anna Freud) and café culture. Austrian and Belgian artists played a crucial role within the complex, rich, and conflictual international networks of people, practices, institutions, and metropoles in an era of political, social and technological change and intense internationalization.

Contributors: Sylvie Arlaud, Norbert Bachleitner, Anke Bosse, Megan Brandow-Faller, Alexander Carpenter, Piet Defraeye, Clément Dessy, Aniel Guxholli, Birgit Lang, Helga Mitterbauer, Chris Reyns-Chikuma, Silvia Ritz, Hubert Roland, Inga Rossi-Schrimpf, Sigurd Paul Scheichl, Guillaume Tardif, Hans Vandevoorde.