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Abstract

This article traces the changing, multifaceted use of the term climate justice on the basis of documents from international relations. It elaborates that climate justice is conceptually and practically characterized by a double tension: particularity and universality as well as stabilization and contestation. With these characteristics, climate justice represents a normative principle, a binding agent of climate policy, as well as a tool for its critique. It opens spaces of negotiation not only for efficient but also for just climate protection measures.

In: Doing Climate Justice

Abstract

In this article we seek to question assumptions about territorial ownership and nation-state sovereignty over the use and exploitation of land as a first step towards doing environmental justice, turn to Christian sources prompting fresh thinking about land and human relationship to the natural environment, bring biblical and patristic thought into conversation with two contemporary Christian environmental justice responses calling us back to our creaturely connection to land, and, finally, rationalize an eco-theology and its implications for an ethic in which right relationship with God and neighbor demands a right and just relationship with the creation.

In: Doing Climate Justice
The struggle against the climate crisis and for a livable future on earth raises profound questions of justice that call for theological engagement. Anchored in concrete situations of climate vulnerability and responsibility, this volume investigates the theological epistemologies, practices and imaginaries that have profoundly shaped climate politics in the past and explores possible theological reformulations that can open up sustainable and just futures. With these critical and constructive theological reflections inspired by Liberation Theology, it seeks to contribute to practices of climate justice by inspiring the development of socially and economically just ways of living in global, interspecial community.

Abstract

Liberating theologies focus primarily on the poor and the relationship between reality and faith perspectives. The editors of this volume present their shared views while sticking to their different theoretical approaches regarding universality and particularity, epistemology, culture and economy. Taking reality and particularly climate issues seriously as well as the consequences for the poor, different social actors, including academia are seen in their different roles in the engagement for a world the humans share with other kinds of being.

In: Doing Climate Justice
Perspektiven in Biologie, Ontologie und praktischer Philosophie
Der Band vereint aktuelle Beiträge, die sich mit der biologischen, anthropologischen, ontologischen und ethischen Dimension des Begriffs der Lebensform befassen.
Das Buch gliedert sich in drei Teile. Der erste Teil („Biologie und Anthropologie“) widmet sich verschiedenen Verwendungsweisen des Begriffes „Lebensform“ sowohl in der aristotelischen als auch zeitgenössischen Philosophie der Biologie. Der zweite Teil („Ontologie“) enthält Beiträge, die mittels des Lebensformkonzepts eine Ontologie des Lebens zu entwickeln beabsichtigen. Der dritte Teil („Praktische Philosophie“) behandelt die Frage, welche normativen Implikationen ein ontologisch-biologisch informierter Lebensformbegriff für die praktische Philosophie hat.