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Abstract

This article describes a model that considers the emergence and florescence of democracies as something embedded in a more encompassing evolutionary process. Democratization in this light is the institutional component of a broader process of human development that promotes people empowerment on various fronts. In this process increasing individual resources give rise to emancipative values that in turn release democratizing social pressures.

In: Comparative Sociology
In: Measuring and Mapping Cultures

Abstract

Although democratic institutions existed long before gender equality, at this point in history, growing emphasis on gender equality is a central component of the process of democratization. Support for gender equality is not just a consequence of democratization. It is part of a broad cultural change that is transforming industrialized societies and bringing growing mass demands for increasingly democratic institutions. This article analyzes the role of changing mass attitudes in the spread of democratic institutions, using survey evidence from 70 societies containing 80 percent of the world's population. The evidence supports the conclusion that the process of modernization drives cultural change that encourage both the rise of women in public life, and the development of democratic institutions.

In: Comparative Sociology
In: Changing Values, Persisting Cultures