Search Results

In: NAN NÜ

Abstract

This article contains a full, annotated translation of A Dream of Spring (Chunmeng lu), written in 1318 by Zheng Xi (1324 jinshi). In A Dream of Spring, Zheng Xi, despite being married, accepts a matchmaker's request to submit a poem to the family of Miss Wu. In the ensuing correspondence with Miss Wu, Zheng Xi uses his masculine literary prerogative to compromise her chastity, which she struggles to defend by the more stringent conventions of feminine composition. The analysis of this fourteenth-century story supplements studies of gendered subjects in the literature of the late Ming and Qing dynasties.

In: NAN NÜ

Abstract

In Song-dynasty Kaifeng, empire and emporia existed in a relationship of mutual dependence and mutual competition. The imperial government depended on merchants for the shipment of grain and goods to supply its massive armies and to pay the salaries of its officials; the merchants derived their income directly or indirectly from these government expenditures. The concentration of wealth and goods in the capital generated in turn a culture of sumptuary competition. The contests over space in the streets of the capital, and the competition for the goods that circulated through them, reveal configurations of power that rarely find direct expression in writing.À Kaifeng, capitale des Song du Nord, l’empire et les emporia se trouvaient dans une relation de dépendance mais aussi de compétition. En effet, le gouvernement impérial dépendait des marchands pour le transport des grains et des marchandises avec lesquels il approvisionnait ses armées et payait les traitements de ses fonctionnaires. Réciproquement les marchands tiraient la plupart de leurs revenus des dépenses gouvernementales. La concentration des richesses et des biens dans la capitale entraîna en retour une compétition somptuaire. La concurrence pour l’espace dans les rues métropolitaines et les rivalités pour l’appropriation des biens qui y circulaient révèlent des configurations de pouvoir rarement exprimées de manière explicite dans les textes.

In: Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient

Abstract

The conventions of inherited genres of literary composition reorganized the essential horizontality of eleventh-century urban space into vertical, hierarchical geographies that excluded markets, stores, alleyways, and commoners. Poems and inscriptions composed in Luoyang render detailed walks within gardens and outside the city walls, but not urban itineraries. Only the unusual events of miracle tales and the unusual time of the peony season disrupt conventional textual geographies and render visible commoners and commerce in a horizontal, vernacular urban space. Archaeological remains further demonstrate the limiting conventions of transmitted texts. Les conventions des genres littéraires traditionnels substituent à l'essentielle horizontalité de l'espace urbain du XIe siècle des géographies verticales et hiérarchiques qui excluent les marchés, les magasins, les ruelles, et le menu peuple. Les poèmes et les inscriptions composées en Luoyang décrivent d'innombrables promenades dans les jardins et en dehors des murs, mais elles omettent les itinéraires urbains. Seuls les événements extraordinaires des contes miraculeux et le temps exceptionnel de la saison des pivoines dérangent les géographies textuelles traditionnelles et rendent visible le menu peuple et le commerce dans un espace urbain qui devient horizontal et informel. Les vestiges archéologiques confirment le caractère restrictif des conventions textuelles transmises par la tradition.

In: Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient