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Abstract

Waiting rooms in general and medical waiting rooms in particular form interesting bonds between wellbeing and heritage. Not only are waiting rooms embedded in a long spatial history but also with a heritage of behavioural politics. That is to say these sites not only organize the ill according to criteria such as class and the urgency of the help needed. More importantly, these rooms come with a clear understanding of how those in waiting are expected to behave and present themselves. This sense of strict spatial organization, however, is opposed by a feeling of being out-of-time and of ambiguous identity. In this article I will analyse the spatial and behavioural heritage of medical waiting rooms and their representation in literary texts.

In: Negotiating Institutional Heritage and Wellbeing
The Shore from Shakespeare to Banville
The shore defies definition. The shore deconstructs and rebuilds, is the beginning or end of a journey, initiates or stops mobility. Here survivors of shipwrecks, like Robinson Crusoe, escape their death; and the weary and tired, like Max Morden, wade back into the womb of nature. The shore is transformation spatialized. Still the coast as literary setting is more than a decorative space. Its utopian/dystopian nature, its liminality and ambiguity invite transgressions of various kinds, which undermine any notion of stable and fixed borders and boundaries. The littoral is liminal, a third space that contests and deconstructs epistemic certainties. This study illustrates this paradigmatic nature of shorelines from William Shakespeare’s The Tempest to John Banville’s The Sea.

Abstract

While the plot of Bithia Mary Croker’s Anglo-Indian ghost stories is often conventional, their unsettling horror lies in the depiction of social pressure British memsahibs encountered upon their arrival in India. Here, they were introduced into communities, which were ruled by minute social requirements. In doing so Croker’s ghost stories not only translate middle-class values into an Indian setting, they also illustrate the volatility of the imperial mind-sets British memsahibs had to navigate.

In: Imperial Middlebrow

Abstract

While the plot of Bithia Mary Croker’s Anglo-Indian ghost stories is often conventional, their unsettling horror lies in the depiction of social pressure British memsahibs encountered upon their arrival in India. Here, they were introduced into communities, which were ruled by minute social requirements. In doing so Croker’s ghost stories not only translate middle-class values into an Indian setting, they also illustrate the volatility of the imperial mind-sets British memsahibs had to navigate.

In: Imperial Middlebrow

Abstract

Britpop-band Pulp’s most successful album A Different Class is mostly concerned, as the title indicates, with questions of class-constructions. The song and the respective music video “Common People” deal with the dynamics surrounding gentrification, the motivations and problems that arise when the well-off move into low-income areas. This paper argues that song and video deconstruct the song’s female character perception of the poor as “cool” as a myth in Barthes’s sense. At the same time the male character’s self-image as a member of the working-classes is equally grounded in mythical social signification. The use of several spaces in “Common People” illustrates the ambiguous nature of class-constructions and their semantic codes.

In: Resistance and the City

Abstract

Britpop-band Pulp’s most successful album A Different Class is mostly concerned, as the title indicates, with questions of class-constructions. The song and the respective music video “Common People” deal with the dynamics surrounding gentrification, the motivations and problems that arise when the well-off move into low-income areas. This paper argues that song and video deconstruct the song’s female character perception of the poor as “cool” as a myth in Barthes’s sense. At the same time the male character’s self-image as a member of the working-classes is equally grounded in mythical social signification. The use of several spaces in “Common People” illustrates the ambiguous nature of class-constructions and their semantic codes.

In: Resistance and the City

Abstract

Intra- and international migration results in the creation of a variety of spaces relegated to structure, process or hinder the mobility of refugees and migrants alike. While migration is often perceived as a primarily mobile event, these spaces do hint at another dimension of life refugees have to endure on a constant basis: indefinite waiting in liminal spaces such as refugee camps or office buildings. These spaces not only create their own temporalities, but they are also found in a sort of legal limbo where rights and responsibilities of those in waiting and those who enforce this waiting become increasingly unclear. This chapter will discuss the representation of such spaces in short stories by E.C. Osondu and Dinaw Mengestu. The theoretical framework will be provided by Marc Augé’s concept of the non-place and Giorgio Agamben’s conept of the camp.

In: Timescapes of Waiting
In: Thinking Northern
In: Sea Change
In: Sea Change