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Abstract

The chimpanzees of the Tai National Park, Ivory Coast, use sticks and stones to open 5 different species of nuts. In spite of an unfavourable availability of the material in the forest, the animals choose their tools adaptively. For cracking harder nuts, they use harder and heavier tools and transport tools more often and from farther away. Some aspects of the evolution of tool-use in primates are discussed.

In: Behaviour
In: Behaviour
In: Behaviour

Abstract

Kin selection theory predicts that recognition and preferences for kin can be highly beneficial. However, evidence of recognition of offspring by fathers in mammals has accumulated very slowly. Especially, in multi-male groups with a promiscuous mating system, like the chimpanzee, where offspring survival does not seem to depend on paternal care, paternal kin recognition has not yet been observed. In this study, we examined whether adult males of a wild chimpanzee community show recognition of their offspring (as determined genetically) and whether infants prefer to interact with kin rather than with unrelated peers. Our analysis utilises up to 14 years of observational data to investigate if adult males associate more frequently and behave less aggressively with females that carry their offspring. Furthermore, we use grooming and play behaviour to establish whether adult males and youngsters show preferences for kin versus non-kin. We found that, adult males did not associate preferentially with females with which they had offspring, but they were generally less aggressive towards any given female when she had a new born infant. Interestingly, however, fathers maintained these low rates of aggression long after the aggression rates of the non-sires had returned to their basal levels. Furthermore, fathers spent significantly more time playing with their own offspring. Thus, our data show for the first time that wild chimpanzee males can recognise their own offspring. Infants preferred to groom and tended to play more with their maternal siblings, but showed only a weak preference for playing with their paternal siblings when given the choice between similarly aged related and unrelated interaction partners. Despite the fact that paternal care does not play an obvious role in chimpanzee survival, kin recognition is observed in different aspects of the life of adult males and youngsters.

In: Behaviour

Our understanding of the functioning of a species’ vocal repertoire can be greatly improved by investigating acoustic variation and using objective classification schemes based on acoustic structure. Here we used a syntactic approach to investigate the acoustic structure of the gorilla close distance vocalizations (‘close calls’), which remain as yet little understood. We examined 2130 calls of 10 mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei) from Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda, and 5 western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) from Bai Hokou, Central African Republic. We segmented calls into units using distinct acoustic features and employed model-based cluster analyses to define the repertoire of unit types. We then examined how unit types were combined into calls. Lastly, we compared unit type use between age–sex classes and the two study groups. We found that the gorilla close calls consist of 5 intergraded acoustic unit types which were flexibly but yet non-randomly concatenated into 159 combinations. Our results are in line with previous quantitative acoustic analyses demonstrating a high degree of acoustic variation in a variety of animal vocal repertoires, particularly close distance vocalizations. Our findings add on to (1) the recent argument that the common practice of describing vocal repertoires as either discrete or graded may be of little value as such distinctions may be driven by human perception and non-quantitative descriptions of vocal repertoires, and (2) recent studies indicating that flexibility in close range social calls can come about through combinatorial systems, which previously have been studied primarily in long distance vocalizations. Furthermore, our study highlights differences in the vocal repertoire of western and mountain gorillas, as expected given differences in environment and social behaviour. Our results offer opportunities for further in-depth studies investigating the function of the gorilla close calls, which will contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of ape vocal communication in general.

In: Behaviour