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In: Psychology in Education
In: Equality in Education

Abstract

This chapter provides a provocative discussion on what constitutes ‘good’ education in an era of competition and inequity. Drawing from philosophers (such as Plato and R. S. Peters) and educational theorists (such as Dewey, Freire, and Apple), Anderson and Boyle pose challenging questions which invite the reader to rethink the value and purpose of education, and its ability to be an agent of social change. Within the current socio-political zeitgeist, much responsibility for flattening the growing inequity curve is placed at the feet of schools, yet what happens within the confines of these institutions can only reflect what is taking place within the societies in which they operate. The authors explore the challenges this presents to schools and systems, as policy makers and educators manage the paradox of expectation; how to reduce inequality through education in a world of growing inequality. Most importantly, the authors appeal for a reconsideration of the purpose of schooling, and for a re-engagement with the debate about what ‘good’ education should look like in today’s diverse and everchanging world.

In: Inclusive Education: Global Issues and Controversies

Abstract

In this chapter Anderson and Boyle provide a critical discussion on the notion of ‘good’ education by analysing how neo-liberalism has impacted education. Gert Biesta’s three-domain model of educational purpose guides their endeavour to disentangle the complexities of what it means to provide ‘good’ education that meets the needs of dynamic and diverse groups of students. They contend that current educational discourse evident in school policies, with its neo-liberal focus on an effective instruction, places a strong emphasis on evidence and practices to bring about measurable outcomes that produce winners and losers; a concept that is problematic as it detracts attention from questions such as “what are students learning?” and “why are they learning?” and “who are they learning it from?” These questions are integral to any interrogation of a socially just and ‘good’ education. The authors conclude that current debates around the construct of inclusive education afford an opportunity to ask the questions that need to be asked, and to challenge the neo-liberal agenda that has driven much of the educational reform of the past decade. To do so could shift the momentum towards fairness and equity in education.

In: Inclusive Education: Global Issues and Controversies
In: Pathways to Belonging
Contemporary Research in School Belonging
School belonging should be a priority across every facet of education. The research on school belonging for positive student outcomes has been widely accepted and findings demonstrating its role as a protective factor against mental ill health and youth suicide are too compelling to ignore. In an age where it has been argued that academic achievement is prioritised over wellbeing, the editors bring the importance of school belonging back to the fore in educational policy and planning. This book is the most comprehensive compendium of its kind on the topic of school belonging. A foreword by Professor John Hattie of The University of Melbourne sets the scene for an engaging look at how school belonging is quintessential in contemporary schooling.

Contributors are: Kelly-Ann Allen, Christopher Boyle, Jonathan Cohen, Crystal Coker, Erin Dowdy, Clemence Due, Jonathan K. Ferguson, Sebastian Franke, Michael Furlong, Annie Gowing, Alun Jackson, Divya Jindal-Snape, Andrew Martinez, Daniel Mays, Vicki McKenzie, Susan Dvorak McMahon, Franka Metzner, Kathryn Moffa, Silke Pawils, Damien W. Riggs, Sue Roffey, Lisa Schneider, Bini Sebastian, Christopher D. Slaten, Jessica Smead, Amrit Thapa, Dianne Vella-Brodrick, Lea Waters, Michelle Wichmann, and Holger Zielemanns.
In: Pathways to Belonging
In: Pathways to Belonging
In: Pathways to Belonging
In: Pathways to Belonging