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Abstract

Stephen Kotkin and Bruce A. Elleman, eds. Mongolia in the Twentieth Century: Landlocked Cosmopolitan Armonk, NY: M.E.Sharpe, 1999 ISBN: 0-7656-0535-X

In: Inner Asia

Abstract

Socialism was more than a political regime or economic system. It was an ideology – a way of thinking and behaving. The socialist state attempted to instil a particular identity in its citizens. Successful or not, it was something citizens of the socialist state had to take into account. The collapse of socialism (or, in China, its modifi cation) has meant people have been forced to come to terms with its economic and political impacts at the same time as they are forced to search within themselves to see who they are and who they want to be.

In: Inner Asia
In: Inner Asia

Abstract

I think that every time I open Christopher Atwood’s new Encyclopedia of Mongolia and the Mongol Empire, I learn something new.While this could be taken as an indication of my ignorance of things Mongolian, I prefer to think of it as a testament to the depth and breadth of Atwood’s work and ability that the Encyclopedia represents. Although geared towards a more general audience (looking up ‘ger’ sends you to the more popular ‘yurt’ and ‘airag’ tells you to look under ‘koumiss’) anyone with an interest in Mongolia or the Mongol Empire will find this an essential book to have on hand. The review copy has been sitting within ready reach of my desk since it arrived, and has become one of the first places I look to when I want to refresh my memory or trace down a quick fact.

In: Inner Asia
In: Inner Asia
In: Inner Asia
A significant aspect of this work is the emphasis on source materials, including some translated from Mongolian and other languages for the first time. The source materials and other articles are all fully contextualized and situated by introductory material by the volume’s editors. This is the first work in English to bring together significant articles in Mongolian studies in one place, which will be widely welcomed by scholars and researchers in this field. This essential reference in two volumes includes works by noted scholars including Charles Bawden, Igor de Rachewiltz, David Morgan, Owen Lattimore and Caroline Humphrey. It also includes excerpts from translations of source documents, such as the works of Rashid al-Din, The Secret History of the Mongols and the Yuan Shih. In addition, more recent historical periods are covered, with material such as Batmonh’s speech that heralded Mongolia’s versions of glasnost and perestroika, as well as Baabar’s Buu Mart, a key work associated with the Democratic Revolution of 1990.

In: The History of Mongolia (3 Vols.)
In: The History of Mongolia (3 Vols.)