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Christopher Waters

Edited by Christopher P.M. Waters

British and Canadian Perspectives on International Law examines the impact of public international law on the United Kingdom’s and Canada’s domestic legal systems. It also analyses the contributions of British and Canadian practice to the development of international norms. Topics addressed include international criminal law, international humanitarian law, human rights and human security, asylum, trade, jurisdiction, ‘reception law’ and media portrayals of international law. Whereas international law scholarship usually takes a global, regional or national approach, this book's chapters are written by leading scholars and practitioners from both countries and provide unique comparative views. While there remains much in common between the two states' understandings of international law, recent developments have shown significant points of departure.

Christopher P.M. Waters

Christopher P.M. Waters

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Christopher P.M. Waters

Winner of the Hart/Socio-Legal Studies Association Book Prize for Early Career Academics, 2005.

This book traces the development of the rule of law in Georgia since its independence and speculates on its future direction. It does so by focusing on changes in the legal profession after 1991. Intriguingly, the book, which is based on extensive field-work, concludes that culture and informal regulation are key to understanding how Georgian lawyers are governed, or rather govern themselves. Indeed, for several years after independence from the Soviet Union there was no functioning law on attorneys; informal regulation, based on the importance of reputation and networks, was the only sort of regulation. Other topics addressed in the book include Georgia’s legal history, its current human rights situation, theories of professionalization, and the link between law and development. The book also compares the Georgian experience to that country’s South Caucasian neighbors - Armenia and Azerbaijan - thus rounding the book out as a regional study.

Christopher P.M. Waters

Adjudicating International Human Rights

Essays in Honour of Sandy Ghandhi

Edited by James A. Green and Christopher P.M. Waters

Adjudicating International Human Rights honours Professor Sandy Ghandhi on his retirement from law teaching. It does so through a
series of targeted essays which probe the framework and adequacy of international human rights adjudication. Eminent international law
scholars (such as Sir Nigel Rodley, Professor Javaid Rehman and Professor Malcolm Evans), along with emerging writers in the field, take Professor Ghandhi’s body of work—focussed on human rights protection through legal institutions—as a starting point for a variety of analytical essays. Adjudicating International Human Rights includes chapters devoted to human rights protection in a number of different institutional contexts, ranging from the ICJ and the Human Rights Committee to truth commissions and NAFTA arbitration tribunals.