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  • Author or Editor: Chrysanthos S. Chrysanthou x
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In the process of recording the history of the Roman Empire, from the death of Marcus Aurelius to the accession of Gordian III, Herodian makes his characters respond to the same situations in similar or different ways. This book shows that each reign in Herodian’s History is creatively mapped onto ever-recurring narrative patterns. It argues that patterning is not simply decorative in Herodian’s work but constitutes a crucial conceptual and methodological tool for writing interpretative history. Herodian deserves credit as an original and independent author. A careful consideration of the formulaic nature of his historiography indicates that there is more artistry in his composition than had previously been discerned.

Abstract

This chapter examines Plutarch’s engagement with other texts and genres in a single scene from the Life of Alexander, that of Darius’ discussion with the eunuch Tireus (Alex. 30), and the effects which such generic and intertextual interaction has on the texture and meaning of Plutarch’s biography as well as on the reader’s response to it. It argues that Darius’ mourning for his wife Statira draws on conventional themes of the lament genre, which Plutarch adopts and manipulates in such a way as to illuminate Darius’ mischief and call attention to important character traits of Darius and Alexander. Moreover, it suggests that an intertextual dialogue with Sophocles’ Oedipus Tyrannus might be recognised in Darius’ prayer. This has the effect of prompting reflection on the themes of human fragility and vulnerability, which are central to both the Lives of Alexander and Caesar.

In: The Dynamics of Intertextuality in Plutarch

Abstract

This chapter examines Plutarch’s engagement with other texts and genres in a single scene from the Life of Alexander, that of Darius’ discussion with the eunuch Tireus (Alex. 30), and the effects which such generic and intertextual interaction has on the texture and meaning of Plutarch’s biography as well as on the reader’s response to it. It argues that Darius’ mourning for his wife Statira draws on conventional themes of the lament genre, which Plutarch adopts and manipulates in such a way as to illuminate Darius’ mischief and call attention to important character traits of Darius and Alexander. Moreover, it suggests that an intertextual dialogue with Sophocles’ Oedipus Tyrannus might be recognised in Darius’ prayer. This has the effect of prompting reflection on the themes of human fragility and vulnerability, which are central to both the Lives of Alexander and Caesar.

In: The Dynamics of Intertextuality in Plutarch
In: Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire
In: Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire
In: Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire
In: Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire
In: Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire
In: Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire
In: Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire