Beckett: une écriture sans mémoire ni désir
Si on pouvait rêver du vide, le rêve beckettien serait celui d’un monde sans mémoire, ni désir, un monde sans autrui – un monde évacué, sans littérature, ni mots, ni pensée. Sans lecteur. Un texte sans lecteur ou une scène sans acteurs.
L’œuvre beckettienne : une œuvre négative ?
Dans cet essai original d’inspiration psychanalytique, Ciaran Ross défend l’idée qu’il est temps de réapprendre à lire la négativité de Beckett . S’inscrivant dans une tradition psychanalytique de la relation d’objet qui va de Klein à Anzieu en passant par Winnicott et Bion, l’ancien analyste de Beckett, l’auteur propose une nouvelle lecture de la première trilogie et d’ En attendant Godot, axée sur l’exploration et la quête du vide et de la négativité, avec ses “objets intermédiaires” , tels le “jeu” et la “pensée” . Soucieux de nuancer et d’équilibrer l’équation entre théorie et texte, symptôme et écriture, l’auteur montre que c’est Beckett qui nous invite à interroger, par le jeu et la pensée, son imagination et son écriture, si riches en matière négative.
L’auteur fait pour la première fois le lien entre les concepts psychanalytiques abordés dans cette étude – le vide, le jeu, la pensée – et les concepts opératoires de la critique post-structuraliste : écriture, différ ance, espacement, altérité.
Trans-National Readings of Modern Irish Literature
Editor: Ciaran Ross
From Swift’s repulsive shit-flinging Yahoos to Beckett’s dying but never quite dead moribunds, Irish literature has long been perceived as being synonymous with subversion and all forms of subversiveness. But what constitutes a subversive text or a subversive writer in twenty-first-century Ireland? The essays in this volume set out to redefine and rethink the subversive potential of modern Irish literature. Crossing three central genres, one common denominator running through these essays whether dealing with canonical writers like Yeats, Beckett and Flann O’Brien, or lesser known contemporary writers like Sebastian Barry or Robert McLiam Wilson, is the continual questioning of Irish identity – Irishness – going from its colonial paradigm and stereotype of the subaltern in MacGill, to its uneasy implications for gender representation in the contemporary novel and the contemporary drama. A subsidiary theme inextricably linked to the identity problematic is that of exile and its radical heritage for all Irish writing irrespective of its different genres.
Sub-Versions offers a cross-cultural and trans-national response to the expanding interest in Irish and postcolonial studies by bringing together specialists from different national cultures and scholarly contexts – Ireland, Britain, France and Central Europe. The order of the essays is by genre.
This study is aimed both at the general literary reader and anyone particularly interested in Irish Studies.
Studies in Anglophone Borders Criticism
Editor: Ciaran Ross
This collection emphasizes a cross-disciplinary approach to the relevance of borders and bordering as a spatial paradigm in Anglophone studies. It sets out to provide a critical counter-narrative to the 1990s globalization argument of a “borderless” world by insisting on the significant roles borders play. The essays range in subject matter from geography, history, British and American literature to painting and Reggae music and map out different conceptualisations of the border: place, line, process, contact zones, etc. The volume’s cross-border “narrative” serves as a point of communication between the local and the global, between Europe and America, between different literary and artistic genres, thus challenging the divides of geography and literature, between “real” territorial borders and their “fictional” counterparts.
In: Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui

Moran's search for Molloy is analysed here by articulating two different psychoanalytic models of interpretation. First the Molloy-Moran relationship is analysed from the post-kleinian perspective of the mother and the role of her thinking. Molloy is read as a destabilising figure of the un-thought which plunges Moran into a gulf that defies thinking and imagining. The second model is Lacanian and shows that the failure of the function of the Name of the Father leaves a void in the chain of signification. This can be seen through Moran's failure to understand the "question of Molloy".

In: Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui
In: Sub-Versions
In: Sub-Versions
In: Reading(s) / Across / Borders
In: Reading(s) / Across / Borders