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Studien zu Apostelgeschichte 13f.: 16,6: 18,23 und den Adressaten des Galaterbriefes
This study poses and answers two questions: 1. What is the basis in the tradition for the Acts 13 and 14 narrative about Paul's and Barnabas' mission on Cyprus and in southern Galatia? 2. Who are the addressees of the letter to the Galatians?
Using the extant inscriptions and literary sources that relate to the provinces of Cyprus and Galatia in the early Roman Empire, the above questions are addressed to Acts and Galatians, and answered as follows: 1 Acts 13-14 contains so much local colour as to rule out the thesis that the so-called first missionary journey is fictional. 2. Paul's letter to the Galatians is addressed to the churches in southern Galatia - Antioch, Iconium, Lystra and Derbe. The hypothesis of a north-Galatian setting is shown to be improbable in the light of the geographical, archaeological and epigraphic evidence.
The Death of Christ in Graeco-Roman Metaphors
How did the first Christians interpret the death of Christ? The answer lies within the earliest Christian documents, primarily within the Pauline letters. Before the users of a modern language could hope to come near an adequate description of what was expressed in these Greek texts of the first Christians, they have to deconstruct layers of later dogmatic interpretation. They need to keep to descriptive terminology reflecting the Greek of the sources and to trace the origin of the metaphoric language early Christians like Paul used. This volume sets out to construct some of the Jewish and Greco-Roman patterns of thought which were initially utilised to express the meaning of the death of Christ.
In: Journal for the Study of Judaism
In: Journal for the Study of Judaism

Abstract

Did Isaiah 53 (LXX) and its παραδıδóναı-terminology influence the early Christian notion of Jesus being delivered "for our sins" (Rom 4:25 etc.)? And if so, is that to be understood as a specific Jewish backdrop for the interpretation of the death of Jesus? The way in which the Septuagint deviates from the Hebrew text suggests another view. To render various terms of his Vorlage the translator of the LXX made use of the widespread Greek notion of delivering somebody unto a hostile force. If early Christian explication of the death of Jesus drew on Isaiah 53, it was influenced by its Greek translation.

In: Novum Testamentum
In: Paulus und Barnabas in der Provinz Galatien
In: Paulus und Barnabas in der Provinz Galatien
In: Paulus und Barnabas in der Provinz Galatien
In: Paulus und Barnabas in der Provinz Galatien
In: Paulus und Barnabas in der Provinz Galatien