Author: Claire Bowen
Abstract At the time when hostility to British engagement in the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq was growing, the repatriation of British soldiers killed in action became the object of public ceremonies and extensive coverage by the tabloids in a characteristic displacement of interest from information about the war to representation and celebration of “ordinary” heroes. This chapter focuses on the exceptionally popular case of Lance Corporal Liam Tasker and his working dog killed in Afghanistan in 2011. Using Foucault’s concept of “regimes of truth” and Christian Salmon’s Storytelling (2007), the study analyses the visual and textual techniques which transform a report of war casualties both into a story about an ordinary man and his dog, and a narrative of national identity confirming the fundamental nature of the British soldier. Repetition, expansion, embellishment and audience participation generate a narrative spiral strengthening shared beliefs and assumptions.
In: Representing Wars from 1860 to the Present
Representing Wars from 1860 to the Present examines representations of war in literature, film, photography, memorials, and the popular press. The volume breaks new ground in cutting across disciplinary boundaries and offering case studies on a wide variety of fields of vision and action, and types of conflict: from civil wars in the USA, Spain, Russia and the Congo to recent western interventions in Afghanistan and Iraq. In the case of World War Two, Representing Wars emphasises idiosyncratic and non-western perspectives – specifically those of Japanese writers Hayashi and Ooka.
A central concern of the thirteen contributors has been to investigate the ethical and ideological implications of specific representational choices.

Contributors are: Claire Bowen, Catherine Ann Collins, Marie-France Courriol, Éliane Elmaleh, Teresa Gibert, William Gleeson, Catherine Hoffmann, Sandrine Lascaux, Christopher Lloyd, Monica Michlin, Guillaume Muller, Misako Nemoto, Clément Sigalas.
In: Representing Wars from 1860 to the Present
In: Representing Wars from 1860 to the Present
In: Representing Wars from 1860 to the Present
In: Representing Wars from 1860 to the Present
In: Representing Wars from 1860 to the Present
Abstract Herrumbrosas lanzas (1983–1986), Juan Benet’s major novel of the Spanish Civil War, is an epic account of war set in the fictional area of Región which becomes briefly the focus of attention for two opposing military commands. The novel, intended by Benet as a picture of the war, is characterized by a descriptive hypertrophy which this chapter analyses as part of the visual and plastic dimension of the text. The different types of description and images, and the reflexive pictorialism of Herrumbrosas lanzas, are informed by Benet’s conception of the “theatre of war” as a place governed by a poetics of simulacrum where military actions unfold in artificial décors, and which cannot resist the corrosive effects of reality. The narrative thus progressively deconstructs the appearances and values of war until the theatre of war, in the literal and metaphorical sense, is destroyed and the whole representation dissolves into nothingness.
In: Representing Wars from 1860 to the Present
In: Ancient Manuscripts in Digital Culture
Visualisation, Data Mining, Communication
Ancient Manuscripts in Digital Culture presents an overview of the digital turn in Ancient Jewish and Christian manuscripts visualisation, data mining and communication. Edited by David Hamidović, Claire Clivaz and Sarah Bowen Savant, it gathers together the contributions of seventeen scholars involved in Biblical, Early Jewish and Christian studies. The volume attests to the spreading of digital humanities in these fields and presents fundamental analysis of the rise of visual culture as well as specific test-cases concerning ancient manuscripts. Sophisticated visualisation tools, stylometric analysis, teaching and visual data, epigraphy and visualisation belong notably to the varied overview presented in the volume.