Pour une démystification de l’Affaire Vernon Sullivan
Author: Clara Sitbon
Boris Vian, faiseur de hoax : pour une démystification de l’Affaire Vernon Sullivan propose la première véritable théorie du canular, ou hoax littéraire : Qu’est-ce qu’un hoax littéraire ? Comment se manifeste-t-il ? Quelles en sont les conséquences sur la fonction de l’auteur ?
S’inspirant de grands théoriciens de la littérature tels Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault ou Jacques Derrida, Clara Sitbon applique sa toute nouvelle théorie des hoaxes littéraires à des exemples tirés des littératures française, britannique et australienne et, ce faisant, parvient à établir la première typologie des hoaxes. Plus précisément, à travers une analyse détaillée de l’Affaire Boris Vian/Vernon Sullivan (1946-1950) comme fil rouge, Clara Sitbon démontre habilement que le hoax littéraire peut être un outil d’analyse littéraire de qualité. Plus important encore, elle prouve que les auteurs pseudonymes, ces compagnons d’infortunes de leurs créateurs ont, eux aussi, une légitimité littéraire.

Boris Vian, faiseur de hoax : pour une démystification de l’Affaire Vernon Sullivan offers the first comprehensive theory of literary hoaxes: What are they? How can recognise them? How do they work? What are their consequences on the notion of authorship?
Drawing on literary theorists such as Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault and Jacques Derrida, Clara Sitbon applies her theory to a range of hoaxes in French, British and Australian literatures, thereby providing a detailed typology of hoaxes. More particularly, through detailed analysis of the Boris Vian/Vernon Sullivan Affair (France, 1946-1950) as a case study for her theory, Clara Sitbon cleverly demonstrates that the literary hoax can indeed be a useful analytical tool in literary criticism. More importantly, she proves that pseudonymous authors can indeed have a literary legitimacy.
Author: Clara Sitbon

For over twenty years, Somaly Mam, with her foundation, has fought sex trafficking in South East Asia. She was considered a modern heroine idolised by everybody, including Ban Ki Moon, the Pope, Michelle Obama and Hillary Clinton. Her autobiography, The Road to Innocence, published in 2005, received the Prize of Truth from the Mayor of Cannes, a small French town. Her story is that of a ten year old girl sold by her grandfather to a rich merchant, then forced to marry a violent soldier at the age of fourteen, before being sold to a brothel where she would be beaten, raped, and tortured. A symbol of several generations of abused women, Somaly Mam confirmed her status as martyr with this piece of literary work that would end up being translated into over twelve languages by 2008. In 2014, a Newsweek Investigation let by Simon Marks revealed that Somaly Mam’s story was completely invented, that she did not grow up in the remote mountains of North Cambodia as she had pretended, and more importantly, it revealed that she went to school until she graduated with a teaching degree. My paper intends to prove how this investigation changed the status of the fake testimony to a pure literary hoax. It also discusses then how this fake testimony brings the literary hoax to the social sphere by focusing on the humanitarian issue of sex trafficking.

In: Deception: Spies, Lies and Forgeries
In: Boris Vian, faiseur de hoax
In: Boris Vian, faiseur de hoax
In: Boris Vian, faiseur de hoax
In: Boris Vian, faiseur de hoax
In: Boris Vian, faiseur de hoax
In: Boris Vian, faiseur de hoax
In: Boris Vian, faiseur de hoax
In: Boris Vian, faiseur de hoax