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In: KronoScope
In: KronoScope

Summary

British painter, Francis Bacon, was one of the most radical iconoclasts of the twentieth century. His utterly individual style (he leaves neither successors nor discernible influence) arises from his profound anxiety about time, both in relation to the great Masters of the past and with regard to his own unique contribution to art history. Even while claiming that every modern artist works “outside a tradition,” Bacon’s historical paranoia leads him to a sustained obsession with the tradition of the papal portrait and with the form of the crucifixion triptych. Tradition is the father figure whose authority must be derided and whose filial slaughter must be exhibited. Positioned between parody and patronage, Bacon’s critical evocation of papal portraiture and crucifixion scenes involves artist and viewer in a network of retrospective uncertainties about modernism’s problematic relation to the Great Masters and its commitment to an aesthetics at once rich in history but existentially, critically, self-conscious of its own place in the modern world.

In: Time and Uncertainty
In: Origins and Futures: Time Inflected and Reflected
Origins and Futures: Time Inflected and Reflected provokes an interdisciplinary dialogue about culture, politics, and science’s strategies to divert the relentless trajectory of time. Literature, socio-political policy, physics, among other subjects, demonstrate the human refusal to enlist in temporal determinism. Articles ranging from how detective fiction and international terrorism manipulate the narration of events, to the unlocking of political trauma through forgiveness, to the genetic archaeology of the Human Genome project and the lacunar amnesia of nuclear energy corporations, all argue that wherever human minds meet they wrestle to undo the irrevocable, the irreversible, the fixed. Although such efforts look to the future, they rarely look straight ahead. Whatever their enterprise, writers, philosophers, and scientists believe that origins are alacritous keys to future hopes and aspirations.

Contributors include: Marcus Bullock, Michael Crawford, Patricia Engle, Carol Fischer, J. T. Fraser, Sabine Gross, Paul Harris, Rosemary Huisman, Karmen MacKendrick, Steven Ostovich, Walter Schweidler, Friedel Weinert, and Masae Yuasa.
In: Origins and Futures: Time Inflected and Reflected
In: Origins and Futures: Time Inflected and Reflected