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Clint Le Bruyns

Abstract

The quality of our democratic life is intimately bound up with the quality of our church-state relations. The aim of this article is to direct attention to the contribution that churches and other faith communities can possibly offer towards the nurturing of a responsible citizenship in political life together. It recognizes and applauds the role of the state itself in advancing the common good, but resists the tendency among many who confine this role to the state alone. Church-state relations are typically discussed simply with reference to church and state, with a blind spot for the people comprising our political community. Responsible citizenship affirms the meaningful and constructive role which ordinary people in their personal and professional capacities can fulfill towards the common good. It consequently discusses the notions of hope, power and grace as some of the concrete ways through which a more participatory democracy or active citizenship might be envisaged, embodied and practiced by the people as part and parcel of their political responsibility together. Each of these aspects bear implications for the contribution churches can provide in public life as they nurture as well as exercise this sense of responsible citizenship.

Clint Le Bruyns

Abstract

This article explores the relationship and interaction between the Roman Catholic Church and Evangelicals as a test case for religious dialogue in general. Apart from the more recent history of this dialogue the article also identifies a numbers of threats to the search for approchement amidst diversity.

Clint Le Bruyns

Abstract

This article employs the methodological framework of Gabriel Fackre on contemporary evangelicalism to explore the discernible public import of the evangelical movement within South Africa. It argues that evangelicals are already participants in public life and can potentially contribute to the healing of a divided and scarred South Africa through their respective ecclesial and theological capital.

Clint Le Bruyns

Abstract

The churches' doctrine of stewardship has featured as both a blessing and bane for their engagement in public life to overcome economic ambiguities in contemporary society. This article discusses various critiques that are levelled at the stewardship impulse as well as some fundamental principles that should direct the churches toward an enlargement of their stewardship paradigms in ways that equip the churches for a more responsible stewardship ethic within their moral spaces. The promise of an ethics of responsible care is finally proposed as a means by which the theological resourcefulness and public impact of this biblically significant albeit controversial notion could be potentially advanced. As such it argues for repositioning the meaning and practice of stewardship in ways that better reflect its ethos of responsible care amidst economic challenges in public life.

Clint Le Bruyns

Abstract

This article critically explores the extent to which corporate social responsibility in South Africa contributes to the quest for gender justice in the world of economy. It fi nds that business has avoided the notion of responsibility in favour of investment and philanthropy, and that meaningful and constructive approaches to gender ideals have not as a result been forthcoming. e article argues for a renewed understanding of and commitment to responsibility with special attention given to underlying perspectives impeding this approach, but sees much promise in the role that churches with their theology and partners could fulfil in assisting the public discourse on women's human dignity, equality and freedom amidst various economic challenges.

Clint Le Bruyns and Robert Vosloo

Felipe Gustavo Koch Buttelli and Clint Le Bruyns

Abstract

This article reflects on the challenges to systematic theology that arise from students’ struggles against capitalism in Brazil and South Africa. It suggests an understanding of the social, political and economic reality, emphasising that these struggles are part of the new social movements that struggle against capitalism. Epistemologically, a kairos and decolonial theology is suggested as a meaningful theological response to the contemporary struggles. Lastly, it affirms that a decolonial theology may help to create hope in struggles to overcome capitalism. It suggests ways to embody this theological approach in political praxis, in a creative way trying to overcome capitalism.