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Summary

Public diplomacy is increasingly facilitated through social media. Government leaders and diplomats are using social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook and Instagram to communicate with foreign publics, changing the dynamics of interaction between broadcaster and audience. The key to understanding the power of social media in public diplomacy is the role of emotion in digital diplomacy strategies: social media statements relating to state identity can incite strong emotions that have the potential to undermine heretofore positive diplomatic relations, or provide communicative openings that move towards ameliorating crises. Examining the interaction of social media, emotion and identity provides insight into the increasing importance of digital diplomacy and the future challenges relating to digital disinformation that lie ahead.

In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy

Summary

Public diplomacy is increasingly facilitated through social media. Government leaders and diplomats are using social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook and Instagram to communicate with foreign publics, changing the dynamics of interaction between broadcaster and audience. The key to understanding the power of social media in public diplomacy is the role of emotion in digital diplomacy strategies: social media statements relating to state identity can incite strong emotions that have the potential to undermine heretofore positive diplomatic relations, or provide communicative openings that move towards ameliorating crises. Examining the interaction of social media, emotion and identity provides insight into the increasing importance of digital diplomacy and the future challenges relating to digital disinformation that lie ahead.

In: Debating Public Diplomacy

It is fifteen years since the first issue of The Hague Journal of Diplomacy ( HJD ) appeared in 2006. To mark the occasion, we have put together an editorial on where diplomacy, diplomatic studies and HJD might be going. In the first editorial heading up the inaugural issue in 2006, we noted ‘possibly excessive worries’ about the foreign policy of the United States, the future of the European Union, and the conduct of what was still known then as the ‘War on Terror’. How times don’t change! We considered re-running the first editorial, only with

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In: The Hague Journal of Diplomacy