Search Results

Restricted Access

Cornelia B. Horn

Abstract

The ancient land of Georgia (Iberia), in the Caucasus, has a long history of settlement and invasion, including incursions by Hittites, Scythians, Persians, and Greeks, to name a few. Pre-Christian beliefs included a varied assortment of beliefs and practices borrowed from Zoroastrian, classical pagan, and other traditions. The accounts of the conversion of Georgia preserved in sources of the 5th, 8th, and 12th centuries reveal how pre-Christian practices were taken up and reinterpreted by the Christian narrators. While there is some evidence of earlier missionary efforts, according to Rufinus' account in the Ecclesiastical History (402-403) Georgia's official conversion to Christianity took place in the first half of the fourth century. This conversion is unique in a number of ways, not the least being that credit for it must be given to a woman, St. Nino, the apostle to the Georgians. Later Georgian sources (12th century) indicate a substantial measure of discomfort with the conversion of Georgia by a woman.

Restricted Access

Transgressing Claims to Sacred Space

The Strategic Advantage of the Portability of Relics for Antichalcedonians in Syria-Palestine in the Fifth and Sixth Centuries ce

Series:

Cornelia B. Horn

Restricted Access

Cornelia Horn and Robert Phenix

This book makes available for the first time in English important works by the anti-Chalcedonian historian and biographer John Rufus on Peter the Iberian, Theodosius of Jerusalem, and Abba Romanus, three key figures of the Christian history of Palestine in the fifth and early sixth centuries C.E. The work offers a new critical edition of the Syriac text; the first-ever published English translation; a substantial introduction to Palestinian monasticism, the christological controversies of the time, and the life and writings of John Rufus; and ample annotations to a Syriac text whose Greek original is no longer available. By providing access to the Christian landscape (literally and metaphorically) in late antique and early Byzantine times, this volume offers a valuable counterbalance from a minority perspective to the biographical and historical writings of the Chalcedonian apologist Cyril of Scythopolis.
Paperback edition is available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org)
Restricted Access

Series:

Cornelia B. Horn

Abstract

The structural framework and individual themes of the sermons of Christ to his disciples as they are presented in the Arabic Apocryphal Gospel of John emphasize the need to preserve and restore church structures with a focus on the support of the priestly ministry. They also highlight the relevance of rebuilding and protecting Christian social life that appears to be threatened from many sides. The text avails itself of these apocalyptic and eschatological interests in order to support overriding ecclesiological concerns for the survival, recovery, and ultimately for the transformation of the Christian church that is faced with a day-to-day Islamic reality of life that has both hostile and attractive sides.

Restricted Access

Series:

Edited by Tamar Nutsubidze, Cornelia B. Horn and Basil Lourié

Restricted Access

Series:

Tamar Nutsubidze, Cornelia B. Horn and Basil Lourié

Restricted Access

Series:

Tamar Nutsubidze, Cornelia B. Horn and Basil Lourié

Restricted Access

Georgian Christian Thought and Its Cultural Context

Memorial Volume for the 125th Anniversary of Shalva Nutsubidze (1888-1969).

Series:

Edited by Tamar Nutsubidze, Cornelia B. Horn and Basil Lourié

The volume contains contributions dedicated to the person and the work of Shalva Nutsubidze and his scholarly interests: the Christian Orient from the fifth to the seventh century, the Georgian eleventh century, the Neoplatonic philosopher Ioane Petritsi and his epoch and Shota Rustaveli and mediaeval Georgian culture. Among the articles are a new edition and translation of the original Georgian author’s Preface to the lost Commentary on the Psalms by Ioane Petritsi and the editio princeps with an English translation of an epistle of Nicetas Stethatos (eleventh century), whose Greek original is lost.

The traditions of Georgian mediaeval thought are considered in their historical context within the Byzantine Commonwealth and are traced in both philosophy and poetry.