Search Results

Cyril Aslanov

Cyril Aslanov

Abstract

The presence of a lexical stock of Romance origin in Yiddish has been interpreted differently by various authors. For D. S. Blondheim they represent a direct continuation of Judeo-Latin. For Max Weinreich, those Romance components go back to specifically Jewish languages, which he called southern and western Loez (a variation on the terms “Italkic” and “Zarphatic” once used by Salomon Birnbaum). This study reconsiders the history of those Yiddish words of Romance origin, focusing on the phonetic development they underwent as they integrated into Yiddish. The contribution of Romance historical linguistics confirms the huge importance of the Italo-Romance connection in this lexical stock, which may reflect the phase when Jews from Byzantine Italy began to settle beyond the Alps. A pinpointed examination of the morphophonemic shape of the loanwords may even hint at specific places of origin on the Italo-Romance dialectal maps. In spite of the dominance of Italo-Romance dialects in the Romance-borrowed lexical stock of Yiddish, some terms attested in both Western and Eastern Yiddish obviously have an Old French origin.

Cyril Aslanov

This article is an attempt to apply some operative methodologies in the research on Jewish languages to the specific blend of French used by French Jews born in France to parents with a North-African background. After a classification of the linguistic material gathered during years of fieldwork in France and Israel according to word origin (Algeria; Morocco; Tunisia; general Maghrebi), it goes on to compare the status of the Arabic word in the Jewish mouth with that of the same words in the colloquial speech of young Muslims born in France to immigrant parents. The analysis of the Arabic elements integrated within the colloquial French speech of Jews and Muslims in today’s France goes further, taking into account the last echoes of the speech specific to Catholic pieds-noirs.