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Thirty-Five Years of Research on Police, Judicial and Administrative Cooperation
This unique volume collects articles and contributions to edited books published throughout his distinguished career by Professor Cyrille Fijnaut, one of the world's leading experts in the fields of organised crime, security and criminology. It makes clear what issues the author systematically explored over the years and how he helped to shape the fields in which he has worked, and continues to work. The texts, reflecting the author's profound understanding of these complex fields and wealth of experience on a practical level, are presented according to topic. In addition, the volume offers English translations of seminal articles published originally in Dutch, thus making these important texts accessible to international scholars for the first time. The volume thus constitutes a unique and indispensable resource for scholars and practitioners, inside and outside the Netherlands.
This book contains analyses of the concrete development and real extent of international police cooperation in Western Europe at several levels, from the bilateral level of cooperation along the Dutch-Belgian-German border to the transatlantic level of cooperation between the American and European police forces. It also contains descriptions of the official and informal viewpoints within France, United Kingdom, Germany, The Netherlands and Belgium concerning the present state and the future of international police cooperation in the European Community.
Since the early 1990s, cross-border police and judicial cooperation has become a very important domain of the European Union. The Lisbon Treaty – if accepted by all the Member States – will certainly be a major stimulus to its further development in the field of internal security as well as in the field of external policy. In any event, the recent proposal for a new third comprehensive policy programme with regard to the Area of Freedom, Security and Justice – the so-called Stockholm Programme – foreshadows some of the changes the Brussels institutions and the Member States would like to embrace in the coming years.

This book contains the contributions of scholars and practitioners to a conference on the future of police and judicial cooperation in the European Union that took place in November 2008 at Tilburg University. Referring to what has been achieved in this domain since the Treaty of Maastricht, these papers not only assess the proposals that have been put forward in successive policy documents relating to the Stockholm Programme, but they also pinpoint to the ongoing problems in the theory and practice of police and judicial cooperation within the European Union and to the ways in which these questions could best be solved.
This book is the result of a conference which the editors, with the support of Dutch authorities, organized in October 22-26, 1990, in The Hague between the members of the New York State Organized Crime Task Force and Dutch officials and academics concerned with the topic.
The contributors, on the one hand, stress the changing nature of organized crime and the mechanisms it utilizes to control legitimate industries. On the other hand, they emphasize and demonstrate the need for sophisticated pro-active strategies that differ from traditional reactive law enforcement approaches.
This book is the first to systematically compare the American situation (New York) and the European situation (Netherlands); two urban areas which show many similarities.
Integrity and corruption have become important issues in the practice and theory of politics, public administration, law, economics and social life. Consequently, they have also become significant topics for law enforcement organisations. Indeed, these organisations play a crucial role in the struggle against corruption in society, and, in order to do that, their own integrity must be beyond doubt.
This volume, with contributions by 35 authors from 13 countries in five continents, offers a comprehensive overview of "corruption, integrity and law enforcement". The related papers were presented at the Second Global Forum on Fighting Corruption and Safeguarding Integrity that took place in The Hague in May 2001. The content and extent of the problem of corruption are presented via case studies from individual countries. Furthermore, corruption and integrity in the law enforcement system itself are highlighted, and the legal instruments that are available to combat corruption and to safeguard integrity are discussed. Special attention is paid here to independent institutions that operate in several countries. Finally, several contributions focus on the global dimension of the subject: the international organisations and initiatives that play an important role in the world-wide struggle against corruption. This volume is therefore of great relevance for policy makers and academic researchers, as well as for practitioners.
In November 2005 Tilburg University hosted for the first time an international Colloquium on the European and National Perspectives of the Regulation of Gambling.
The results of this exciting day are reflected in this book which brings together a wide range of perspectives from the contemporary debate surrounding the regulation of gambling markets within the context of the European Union. Not only does the book encompass both ends of the spectrum of the current discussion; it also brings together the perspectives of academics, lawyers and operators.
The debate on the regulation of gambling has been gathering pace following a series of judgments of the ECJ. In 2006 gambling was excluded from the proposed Services Directive, and the European Commission commenced infringement proceedings against a handful of Member States regarding restrictions on the supply of sports betting services. Given these developments and being one of the very few publications concerned with this topic, this book will serve as a timely and valuable contribution for all those interested in this emerging and at times decisive debate.
When can a state give political support to a military intervention in another state? The Government of the Netherlands commissioned an international Expert Group composed of eminent members from the fields of international law, international relations and diplomacy. The Expert Group’s objective was to examine this complex, topical and time-sensitive question and to consider whether the government should press for international acceptance of humanitarian intervention as a new legal basis for the use of force between states in exceptional circumstances. This volume is the result of those efforts. The Expert Group was led by Professor Cyrille Fijjnaut and consisted of Mr. Kristian Fischer, Professor Terry Gill, Professor Larissa van den Herik, Professor Martti Koskenniemi, Professor Claus Kreß, Mr. Robert Serry, Ms. Monika Sie Dhian Ho, Ms. Elizabeth Wilmshurst and Professor Rob de Wijk. Their thorough analysis and recommendations offer important insights that can aid governments in formulating a position on political support for the use of force between states and humanitarian intervention. The volume also constitutes a useful tool for scholars and practitioners in considering these difficult and important issues.

From the Foreword by Stef Blok, Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands:

"The Expert Group’s thorough analysis and recommendations on this complex subject offer important insights that can aid the government in formulating its position on political support for the use of force between states and humanitarian intervention. In drawing up this advisory report the Expert Group has helped the government develop a new, contemporary vision on these issues...."
A Plea for a Balanced Cannabis Policy
What is sensible when it comes to developing and implementing a policy with regard to products which in the case of regular use are harmful, but which at the same time exert a strong attraction, even so strong that people (may) become dependent on or addicted to them? This question relates to many illicit drugs, but these days it is, both nationally and internationally, mainly related to the policy regarding the production, distribution and consumption of cannabis. Generally speaking, the legalization of cannabis in Uruguay and in some states of the United States of America, in particular Colorado and Washington State, has given a powerful impetus to the discussion about the cannabis policy. In the Netherlands, that discussion has become increasingly relevant over the past years because of the struggle of coffeeshop owners and political parties. This volume offers the first English-language analysis of the situation in the Netherlands in order to make a contribution to the international debate on this heated topic. Since the 1960s, the Dutch cannabis policy has been an important point of reference in the international discussion about the policy that should be pursued regarding the use of cannabis. However, in international and foreign literature about cannabis policy the developments in the Netherlands are often depicted in an incomplete or one-sided manner, which has a negative impact on the quality of the international debate about what has happened and what should happen now. This volume seeks to redress that imbalance.
The United States and Europe have recently experienced a significant expansion in the use of undercover police tactics and technological means of surveillance. In a democratic society, such tactics raise significant questions for public policy and social research. New and sophisticated forms of crime and social control (and their internationalization) represent an important and neglected topic. Realizing this, the leading scholars in this field created a European and American working group for the comparative study of police surveillance. This collaborative, landmark volume reports the results of their work. It is the first book ever devoted to the comparative study of the topic and includes articles on the historical development of covert policing in Europe and its spread to the United States (where it was extended and recently exported back to Europe), plus detailed accounts of the use of covert tactics in France, Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium, the United Kingdom, Iceland, Sweden, Canada and the United States.
Audience: Social scientists, historians, policy makers, lawyers, and criminal justice practitioners.
This book finds its origins in a transatlantic colloquium held in the European Parliament in Brussels in May 2002. After an introductory overview of the US and European responses to 9/11 it addresses the main legal aspects of the fight against international terrorism, namely police and judicial cooperation (including mutual legal assistance, extradition and the role of entities like Europol and Eurojust), financial initiatives (e.g. by the UN Security Council, the FATF and the EU), human rights and rule of law issues (such as trial by military commissions, detention of alleged unlawful combatants and others, state of emergency derogations, due process, the death penalty and privacy) and international law aspects (inter alia self-defence, the application of international humanitarian law, prisoner of war status, the role of the UN, in particular the Security Council, sanctions and the negotiations on a comprehensive convention on combating terrorism). Each topic is considered from a US and from a European perspective.