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Abstract

This article examines the use of boundaries and the related phenomenon of hybridity in the book of Nahum through a variety of postcolonial optics. Moving beyond the essentialist/interactivist dichotomy, it explores the various kinds of difference between Judah and Neo-Assyria that Nahum articulates, their reuse as a means of critiquing Assyria, and the intriguing similarity between Judah and all nations but Assyria. The article also suggests that an inner-Judahite distinction coexists alongside the book’s response to empire, and that Nahum’s stereotypes are crucial to its varied uses of hybridity.

In: Horizons in Biblical Theology
In: The Non-Israelite Nations in the Book of the Twelve
In: The Non-Israelite Nations in the Book of the Twelve
In: The Non-Israelite Nations in the Book of the Twelve
In: The Non-Israelite Nations in the Book of the Twelve
In: The Non-Israelite Nations in the Book of the Twelve
In: The Non-Israelite Nations in the Book of the Twelve
In: The Non-Israelite Nations in the Book of the Twelve
In: The Non-Israelite Nations in the Book of the Twelve