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Daniel Hernández Joseph

Summary

No other foreign service has as strong a consular concentration, or is as centered in a single other country, as the Mexican Foreign Service and its consular network in the United States. Mexico has 73 embassies and 67 consulates throughout the world — with 50 of these consulates in the United States. Clearly, consular work and particularly the consular tasks that are performed in the United States take up a large part of the resources, attention and priority of Mexican foreign policy.

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Edited by Daniel M. Gurtner, Juan Hernández and Paul Foster

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Daniel M. Gurtner, Juan Hernández and Paul Foster

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Edited by Daniel M. Gurtner, Juan Hernández and Paul Foster

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Edited by Daniel M. Gurtner, Juan Hernández and Paul Foster

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Edited by Daniel M. Gurtner, Juan Hernández and Paul Foster

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Edited by Daniel M. Gurtner, Juan Hernández and Paul Foster

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Edited by Daniel M. Gurtner, Juan Hernández and Paul Foster

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Edited by Daniel Gurtner, Juan Hernández, Jr. and Paul Foster

The collection of essays focuses on the twin areas of research undertaken by Prof. Michael W. Holmes. These are the sub-disciplines of textual criticism and the study of the Apostolic Fathers. The first part of the volume on textual criticism focuses on issues of method, the praxis of editing and collating texts, and discussions pertaining to individual variants. The second part of the volume assembles essays on the Apostolic Fathers. There is a particular focus on the person and writings of Polycarp, since this is the area of research where Prof. Holmes has worked most intensively.

Lucía Bergós, Florencia Grattarola, Juan Manuel Barreneche, Daniel Hernández and Solana González

Abstract

Rural Uruguay is undergoing a long process of transformations that tend to weaken the maintenance of local cultural traits, including society-nature relationships. To preserve these traits and enhance our understanding of these relationships, it is necessary to both strive for the empowering of rural communities and to establish a constructive exchange of knowledge. JULANA (an acronym from the Spanish for “Playing in Nature”) works towards these goals through the dialogue of the different conceptions of nature and society. This work presents an experience in collaborative-learning, the participatory monitoring project named Fogones de Fauna carried out in the village of Paso Centurión, along with reflections on the value of JULANA’s work and education.