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Chapter 1 Reimagining Child-Parent Research

Abstract

How can child-parent research be reimagined? This introductory chapter offers a historical context of children doing research and develops a conceptual framework for understanding facets of child-parent research. The premise of this line of inquiry includes authenticity, empowerment, and insight. The authors contemplate the range of involvement and partnership and provide a wheel metaphor to capture the dynamic and nuanced interplay of dialogue, critical reflection, ethics, tension, and participation. There are ethical concerns addressed through a critical discussion about hierarchies, power, and voice in child-parent research, which hinges on a shared purpose and requires an approach that is carefully cultivated to be egalitarian, inclusive, dialogic, and reciprocal.

Full Access
In: Child-Parent Research Reimagined
Child-Parent Research Reimagined challenges the field to explore the meaning making experiences and the methodological and ethical challenges that come to the fore when researchers engage in research with their child, grandchild, or other relative. As scholars in and beyond the field of education grapple with ways that youth make meaning with digital and nondigital resources and practices, this edited volume offers insights into nuanced learning that is highly contextualized and textured while also (re)initiating important methodological and epistemological conversations about research that seeks to flatten traditional hierarchies, honor youth voices, and co-investigate facets of youth meaning making.

Contributors are (in alphabetical order): Charlotte Abrams, Sandra Schamroth Abrams, Kathleen M. Alley, Bill Cope, Mary Kalantzis, Molly Kurpis, Linda Laidlaw, Guy Merchant, Daniel Ness, Eric Ness, "E." O’Keefe, Joanne O’Mara, Anthony J. Onwuegbuzie, Sarah Prestridge, Lourdes M. Rivera, Dahlia Rivera-Larkin, Nora Rivera-Larkin, Alaina Roach O’Keefe, Mary Beth Schaefer, Cassandra R. Skrobot, and Bogum Yoon.

Abstract

How can child-parent research be reimagined? This introductory chapter offers a historical context of children doing research and develops a conceptual framework for understanding facets of child-parent research. The premise of this line of inquiry includes authenticity, empowerment, and insight. The authors contemplate the range of involvement and partnership and provide a wheel metaphor to capture the dynamic and nuanced interplay of dialogue, critical reflection, ethics, tension, and participation. There are ethical concerns addressed through a critical discussion about hierarchies, power, and voice in child-parent research, which hinges on a shared purpose and requires an approach that is carefully cultivated to be egalitarian, inclusive, dialogic, and reciprocal.

Full Access
In: Child-Parent Research Reimagined