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Humanist writers who extolled Ciceronian Latin exercised a broader idiomatic range in their writing. The letters of Piccolomini offer a familiar example where classical diction merges with biblical and medieval idioms. Their expanded linguistic range reflects the interaction of court and cathedral in Piccolomini’s diplomatic missions, in which he served as both an imperial ambassador and a churchman at the highest levels of theological controversy. Nearly a century later, Alejo Vanegas (1498–1562), Master of Grammar in Toledo, another avowed devotee of Ciceronian Latin, published a commentary on the Samarites Comoedia (1539) at the request of the Sacristan of Toledo Cathedral who saw the play’s educational value and wanted its lessons disseminated in Latin for the schools. Through a meticulous, even encyclopedic, commentary, Vanegas explained the play’s poetics and literary sources as a competent humanist scholar, but the schoolmaster also devoted himself to explaining its ethical and doctrinal import, presenting theological explanations in the terminology of scholasticism. Vanegas’s Latin reflects the blend of linguistic traditions, owing much to Erasmus but also drawing on the Latin of patristic and medieval theology and even reaching into the Spanish vernacular at key moments. Vanegas delivered well on his commission. His commentary is rooted in the needs of students for whom grammatical explanations and literary paraphrases were essential, but whose education also required the language of the Bible, the medieval scholars, and their own Spanish milieu. Vanegas thus epitomizes Neo-Latin’s expanded linguistic and cultural range.

In: Acta Conventus Neo-Latini Albasitensis
In: Frater Petrus, Collationes de tempore (Fourteenth Century)  
Editor / Translator:
In: Frater Petrus, Collationes de tempore (Fourteenth Century)  
The Commentary on the Sentences of Petrus Lombardus
Editor:
The Sentences Commentary of Giles of Viterbo embodies the intellectual and spiritual vision of one of the luminaries of the Italian Renaissance and a reformer of his religious order. Giles strove to locate in ancient wisdom truths revealed in the Bible and Christian doctrine. He composed “according to Plato's mind,” but, influenced by Ficino and the revival of theologia Platonica, he integrates material from Greek myth and metaphysics with the Bible and Christian theology. Until now only a small portion of Giles's Commentary has been published, yet this major work contains some of the best examples of his interpretive method. The present edition contains the entire Commentary as far as Giles proceeded with his ambitious project.
Author:
The sermons here published for the first time are attributed to an otherwise unknown friar referred to simply as Frater Petrus. The collection provides evidence of actual preaching in a normal setting from fourteenth-century Germany, between the beginnings of the Franciscan order and the Observant reform movement, not by a major light of the order, but a regular member who may have held status as an intermediate-level teacher, to judge by the care with which the manuscripts were prepared. Theologically competent and gracefully presented in the conventional sermon style of the period, the collection, edited and translated by Daniel Nodes, offers scholars and students a reliable new resource in an area of sermon studies that is still in short supply.
Author:

Abstract

Augustine of Hippo writes in the Retractations that he composed his Psalmus contra Partem Donati (393) as a retort to the rhymed "psalms" which Donatist congregations chanted, and that he had intended his own Psalm for chanting in his congregation. Instead of a lyrical hymn, however, Augustine composed a brilliant defense of the catholic understanding of the nature and mission of the Christian community in the world. The piece was meant for his congregation to sing according to individual capacity but was structured and delivered as a homily rather than a hymn. To produce his didactic, polemical sung sermon, Augustine employed not only the standard rhetorical elements like repetition, anaphora, and even prosopopoeia, which readers have recognized, he also used the organizational pattern of forensic oratory: exordium, narratio, refutatio, confirmatio, and peroratio, which has not been commented on. The form of the Psalmus also has no sources in Latin but it reflects the pattern of other verse sermons of the era, such as those abundantly represented in the Greek East.

In: Vigiliae Christianae
Author:
The Samarites by Petrus Papeus offers an effective blending of gospel narrative and ancient Roman comedy, combining manner of Plautus and Terence with the didacticism of medieval allegory and morality plays and the poetic diction of Renaissance humanism. In the Samarites they are the ingredients that present both moral and doctrinal teachings related to the gospel parables of the Prodigal Son and Good Samaritan. Papeus’ work is an excellent example not only of the early modern school play, but also of the shifting conceptions of drama in Europe at that time. Daniel Nodes presents a critical edition and translation of the play together with a humanist commentary produced in Toledo by Alexius Vanegas three years after the play’s first printing in Antwerp.
In: Vigiliae Christianae
In: Vigiliae Christianae
In: Vigiliae Christianae