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Author: Daniel Potthast

Abstract

The loss of the premodern state archives in the Arabic world forces researchers, when they want to include documentary sources, to rely on document quotations found in chancery manuals, collections of exemplary letters, and historiographical works. Even though chancery secretaries composed many of these works, we can never know for certain how correct their quotations are. Cases in which the original document is preserved elsewhere in addition to its being quoted in inshāʾ (composition manual) literature would help us a great deal in determining the actual strategies by which documents were quoted. To date, we know of only one such case: an original Mamlūk-Aragonese treaty (of 1293) that is partialy preserved in the Archivo de la Corona de Aragón in Barcelona and completely quoted in al-Qalqashandī’s Ṣubḥ al-aʿshà (Dawn of the Nightblind). A comparison of the two texts shows that al-Qalqashandī’s text follows the original very closely but shortens the formulaic parts. Hence we can assume that quotations in inshāʾ literature can be used as historical sources. Their value for a diplomatic analysis of documents and chancery practices is, in contrast, limited.

In: From Qom to Barcelona
In: From Qom to Barcelona
In: From Qom to Barcelona
In: From Qom to Barcelona
In: From Qom to Barcelona
Aramaic, South Arabian, Coptic, Arabic and Judeo-Arabic Documents
Volume Editors: Andreas Kaplony and Daniel Potthast
The renaissance of Arabic Papyrology has become obvious by the founding of the International Society for Arabic Papyrology (ISAP) at the Cairo conference (2002), and by its subsequent conferences in Granada (2004), Alexandria (2006), Vienna (2009), Tunis/Carthage (2012), Munich (2014), and Berlin (2018). This volume collects papers given at the Munich conference, including editions of previously unpublished Coptic, Arabic and Judeo-Arabic documents, as well as historical studies based on documentary evidence from Achaemenid Bactria, Ancient South-Arabia, and Early Islamic, Fāṭimid and Mamlūk Egypt.

Contributors: Anne Boud'hors; Ursula Bsees; Peter T. Daniels; Maher A. Eissa; Andreas Kaplony; W. Matt Malczycki; Craig Perry; Daniel Potthast; Peter Stein; Naïm Vanthieghem; Oded Zinger 
In: From Bāwīṭ to Marw. Documents from the Medieval Muslim World
In: From Bāwīṭ to Marw. Documents from the Medieval Muslim World
The dry climate of Egypt has preserved about 130,000 Arabic documents, mostly on papyrus and paper, covering the period from the 640s to 1517. Up to now, historical research has mostly relied on literary sources; yet, as in study of the history of the Ancient World and medieval Europe, using original documents will radically challenge what literary sources tell us about the Islamic world.

The renaissance of Arabic papyrology has become obvious by the founding of the International Society for Arabic Papyrology (ISAP) at the Cairo conference (2002), and by its subsequent conferences in Granada (2004), Alexandria (2006), Vienna (2009), and Tunis (2012). This volume collects papers given at the Vienna conference, including editions of previously unpublished Coptic and Arabic documents, as well as historical and linguistic studies based on documentary evidence from Early Islamic Egypt.

With contributions by: Anne Boud’hors; Florence Calament; Alain Delattre; Werner Diem; Alia Hanafi; Wadād al-Qāḍī; Ayman A. Shahin; Johannes Thomann and Jacques van der Vliet.

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