Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for

  • Author or Editor: Daniela Vallega-Neu x
Clear All

This essay addresses time’s dissemination both in the sense of an undoing or fracturing of unifying conceptions of time, as well as in the sense of ‘scattering seeds’ by conceiving of manifold temporalizing configurations of living beings, things, and events without an overarching sense of time. After a consideration of traditional conceptions of time, this essay explores the notion of duration in Bergson in order to make it fruitful for thinking duration without centering it in human consciousness. The author suggests that we can begin to think the temporal happening of things and events in terms of different temporal configurations of various degrees and qualities of complexity that may be occasioned by chance, whereby chance is understood as the freeing of time-spaces of indeterminacy in which temporal configurations take shape or manifest themselves.

In: Research in Phenomenology
In: Research in Phenomenology

Using as guiding thread the difference between being (beyng) and beings, this article traces and questions the movement of Heidegger’s thinking in his non-public writings from Contributions to Philosophy (1936–38) to The Event (1941–42) and ends with references to the thought of Gelassenheit (1944/45). In 1941–42 this movement takes the form of a “downgoing” into the abyssal, withdrawing dimension of being. Heidegger rethinks the event in terms of inception (Anfang) as he attempts to let go of any form of representational thinking more radically than in Contributions and seeks to respond in imageless saying to nothing but the silent call of beyng. Heidegger’s downgoing brings with it a transformed relation to history and to what he calls “machination,” as well as a shift from dispositions marked by decision, strife, and endurance to thinking in terms of releasing, following, and thanking.

In: Research in Phenomenology
In: Research in Phenomenology
In: Research in Phenomenology
Research in Phenomenology is an international peer-reviewed journal for current research in phenomenology and contemporary continental philosophy as practiced in its global setting. In addition to critical studies of major themes and figures in this area of research, the journal publishes studies dealing with current topics at the intersection of philosophy and the humanities, as well as historical studies relevant to the phenomenological tradition. The journal devotes one issue each year to a special topic and includes in-depth reviews of significant, recently published books in this area of research.
Need support prior to submitting your manuscript? Make the process of preparing and submitting a manuscript easier with Brill's suite of author services, an online platform that connects academics seeking support for their work with specialized experts who can help.
NOW AVAILABLE - Online submission: Articles for publication in Research in Phenomenology can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here.

 Click on title to see all prices

Abstract

Comparisons between Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty’s writings on the body tend to focus on the earlier works of these philosophers, i.e. on Merleau-Ponty’s Phenomenology of Perception, and Heidegger’s Zollikon Seminars in the context of Being and Time. This paper focuses on their later works in order to show how each philosopher respectively opens venues to think the human body non-subjectively and as emerging from being, where being includes the being also of other bodies, things, or events. This thinking of bodies “from being” articulates them in terms of spatio-temporal events. The article shows that in thinking from being, both Heidegger’s and Merleau-Ponty’s accounts harbor a sense of being with a unifying force, which is tied to meaning or sense. The article ends by questioning the possibility of accounts of bodies as spatio-temporal events not bound by a unifying force of being, bodies that may carry both sense and non-sense.

In: Research in Phenomenology