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  • Author or Editor: Daniella Zaidman-Mauer x
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Abstract

Between the years 1650 and 1800, Amsterdam became the center of Yiddish printing. Vernacular medical writings were among the variety of Yiddish books published in Amsterdam. The Yiddish remedies book Seyfer Yerum Moyshe, published in 1679, was written by Moyshe Rofe mi-Kalish. In this article I intend to examine the paratexts of this book and present as a case study the doctor’s recommendations to confront the plague. He explains his remedies are credible and have been tried by many doctors. His book would not only save its readers from having to call a doctor and pay him a lot of money, but also give them remedies they can prepare in their homes or find in their pharmacies. Whether rich or poor, everyone should have access to remedies. Kalish stresses the fact that ultimately leading a pious life, together with these remedies, will promise health and longevity, with G-d’s help.

Open Access
In: Zutot

Abstract

Exposing a thief magically with the aid of a painted eye on the wall, has existed since antiquity. The spell includes instructions for drawing an eye, incantations, summoning up God’s help, and knocking a nail into the painted eye, thus harming the thief’s eye and exposing him. In this article we present the same spell written in Yiddish dating between the fifteenth to the sixteenth century. In tracing the Yiddish spell’s sources for both the text and its illustration, our examination reinforces previous scholarship of magical praxis, which asserts that rituals are cross-cultural and cannot always be traced to its Jewish or non-Jewish origins.

Open Access
In: European Journal of Jewish Studies