Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Dave Aftandilian x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All

Abstract

Since the 1960s, many have sought the solutions to North America's ecological crisis in the environmental teachings of Native American peoples. However, for the most part, Native American environmental values have not been investigated in light of the cultural contexts within which they arose. This paper draws on previously published ethnographic work among the Koyukon of interior Alaska and the Hopi of the desert Southwest to elucidate the specific environmental ethics that these two peoples have developed. Based on this contextualized evidence, augmented with teachings from the environmental ethics of other Native American peoples, I then discuss what other Americans can and cannot learn from Native American environmental ethics. Finally, I suggest alternate sources upon which non-indigenous Americans might draw to develop their own traditions of caring about and for the lands they now share with Native peoples.

In: Worldviews: Global Religions, Culture, and Ecology

Abstract

Although animals have served as subjects and objects of religion since the Paleolithic, they are often omitted from standard religious studies courses. In this article, I discuss some best practices for introducing students to the study of animals and religion. After outlining some of the benefits of teaching about animals and religion, I explain the pros and cons of the two main approaches: by tradition or by topic. The majority of the article discusses some of the most important topics to include, as well as how best to approach several of them in terms of pedagogy and media. The final section explains the importance of bringing real animals into courses like this, and offers a variety of experiential education techniques for doing so, including contemplative practices.

In: Worldviews: Global Religions, Culture, and Ecology