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Antonella Alimento and Koen Stapelbroek (eds.), The Politics of Commercial Treaties in the Eighteenth Century. Balance of Power, Balance of Trade. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, 472 pp., ISBN: 9783319535739, € 106.00.

This collection of essays has a double programme. First, it seeks to explore the relevance, contents and perception of commercial treaties in the later seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Secondly, it purports to bridge different approaches towards the theme and in so doing to expand the understanding of commercial treaties. The rich introduction, written by the volume’s editors, provides an overview of the literature thus far

Open Access
In: Journal of the History of International Law / Revue d'histoire du droit international
In: The Company in Law and Practice: Did Size Matter? (Middle Ages-Nineteenth Century)

Abstract

In 1516 and 1518, the Antwerp City Council introduced a collective system of debt recovery, which broke with the tradition of priority for the first seizing claimant. This view resulted in a legal framework, which was based on the concept of publicly known insolvency. Because of the vague legal definitions in the 1582 and 1608 customary law compilations, the position of pursuing creditors was strengthened. Although these rules weren't successful, they demonstrate an early intention to draw the line between criminal bankruptcy, persisting insolvency and temporary payment problems.

In: Tijdschrift voor Rechtsgeschiedenis / Revue d'histoire du droit / The Legal History Review

Abstract

The 1582 Antwerp costuymen influenced Amsterdam law during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Although the Antwerp law has often been considered as an applicable law in the Amstel city, its role was more limited. At the end of the sixteenth century and during the first half of the seventeenth century, it was used as a common and subsidiary applicable law for certain mercantile issues. Later on, as the Amsterdam legislator issued ordinances on these themes, this function declined. Yet, references to the Antwerp law book were still common in the eighteenth century, although they were more a consequence of a cultural attraction than of an actual application of the Brabant law book.

In: Tijdschrift voor Rechtsgeschiedenis / Revue d'histoire du droit / The Legal History Review

Cet ouvrage, qui est la version imprimée d’un Habilitationsschrift qui fut défendu en 2007 à la Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität de Francfort, examine la jurisprudence et la procédure judiciaire devant le Reichskammergericht en matière de lettres de change, au cours de la longue période entre 1495 et 1806. Tout d’abord, 195 dossiers de procès ont été examinés; ceux-ci avaient été amenés devant le Gericht précité depuis Francfort, qui était un centre financier important pour le Saint Empire romain et pour toute l’Europe occidentale. La majorité des documents et textes utilisés – outre les dossiers de

In: Tijdschrift voor Rechtsgeschiedenis / Revue d'histoire du droit / The Legal History Review

Abstract

Projects and charters of company statutes that were drafted in early seventeenth-century Sweden were often written by or in close cooperation with merchants; they contain elements selected from Dutch and English texts and practices. This points to legal borrowing, but also, the plans and charters built on ideas of corporate governance that had not been practiced elsewhere. In that regard, Swedish sources are vital for understanding this vibrant initial phase of the history of corporate governance. Moreover, the chapter demonstrates that the variables that determined which foreign characteristics of organization were chosen could be, and often were, cultural and political, rather than economic.

In: The Development of Commercial Law in Sweden and Finland (Early Modern Period–Nineteenth Century)

Abstract

Projects and charters of company statutes that were drafted in early seventeenth-century Sweden were often written by or in close cooperation with merchants; they contain elements selected from Dutch and English texts and practices. This points to legal borrowing, but also, the plans and charters built on ideas of corporate governance that had not been practiced elsewhere. In that regard, Swedish sources are vital for understanding this vibrant initial phase of the history of corporate governance. Moreover, the chapter demonstrates that the variables that determined which foreign characteristics of organization were chosen could be, and often were, cultural and political, rather than economic.

In: The Development of Commercial Law in Sweden and Finland (Early Modern Period–Nineteenth Century)